KINDAI UNIVERSITY


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Aki Toyoyama

Profile

FacultyMajor in Global Studies
PositionLecturer
DegreePhD
Commentator Guidehttp://www.kindai.ac.jp/meikan/1463-toyoyama-aki.html
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Last Updated :2017/11/18

Education and Career

Education

  •   1996 04  - 2000 03 , Kinki University, Faculty of Literature, Art, and Cultural Studies, Department of Cultural Studies
  •   2000 04  - 2002 03 , Kansai University, Graduate School of Letters, MA Course, Art History and Aesthetics Major, Department of Philosophy
  •   2002 04  - 2008 03 , Kansai University, Graduate School of Letters, PhD Course, Art History and Aesthetics Major, Department of Philosophy

Academic & Professional Experience

  •   2016 04 ,  - 現在, Lecturer, Kindai University
  •   2013 04 ,  - 現在, Visiting Fellow, Miyagi Gakuin Women's University
  •   2014 04 ,  - 2016 03 , Research Fellow, National Museum of Ethnology
  •   2012 04 ,  - 2014 03 , Visiting Fellow, National Museum of Ethnology
  •   2009 04 ,  - 2012 03 , Postdocrtal Fellow, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
  •   2008 04 ,  - 2009 03 , Research Fellow, Kansai University

Research Activities

Research Areas

  • Art studies, Fine art history

Research Interests

  • cave temple, cultural heritage, trade, tile, art history, India

Published Papers

  • Symbolism of Japanese Tiles in Interwar India, Aki TOYOYAMA, Socio-Economic History, 82(3), 35 - 50, Nov. 2016 , Refereed
  • Cave Temples as the Imagining of India: The Negotiation between Early Modern Indian Tradition and Colonial Knowledge, Aki TOYOYAMA, The Challenge of the Object: The Proceedings of the 33rd Congress of the International Committee of the History of Art, Part 2, 482 - 486, 2013 , Refereed
  • Indigenous Tradition, Reproductive Modernity:The Haveli Murals, Popular Art and Marwari Identity in Colonial India, Toyoyama Aki, JJASAS, 南アジア研究, 2012(24), 56 - 80, 2012 , Refereed
    Summary:The mercantile community Marwaris built their residential mansions called havelis in their hometowns of the Shekhawati region during the 1830s and 1930s. Most of the havelis are decorated with mural paintings that are divided into two phases-prior/posterior to 1900. It is generally considered that the murals prior to 1900 retain indigenous tradition while most of the murals after 1900 are inferior copies of prints, destructing indigenous tradition.
    The iconographical analysis of the murals prior to 1900 suggests that they were influenced by contemporary popular culture such as Kalighat painting and Battala woodprint that were common in the colonial port city of Calcutta where the Marwaris had their economical strongholds. A perspective, in which pre-1900 murals are considered indigenous and traditional, can be indeed traced back to the cultural administration of the colonial power.
    The murals after 1900, on the other hand, are dominated by the copies of newly emerged prints such as oleograph and chromolithograph. In terms of the impact of popular art, the haveli murals both prior/posterior to 1900 are stylistically continuous rather than disconnection of tradition/modernity. This stylistic development may also reflect the changing identity of the Marwaris from merchants to industrialists in colonial India
  • Through Ports, Passes, and Junctions: Reconsideration of the Excavational Patterns of Minor Buddhist Caves in Western India, Nobuo NAKATANI, Fumitaka YONEDA, Akinori UESUGI, and Aki TOYOYAMA, South Asian Archaeology 2007: Proceedings of the 19th Meeting of the European Association of South Asian Archaelogy, Vol. II Historic Periods, 225 - 232, 2010 , Refereed
  • The Patterning of Landscape and Ideology: A Study of Buddhist Rock-cut Monasteries in the Early Historic Western Deccan (Unpublished PhD Thesis), Aki TOYOYAMA, Kansai University, 2008 , Refereed
  • Manmodi Cave 40 at Junnar : Its Significance as Reflected in the Inscription and the Facade Decoration, TOYOYAMA Aki, 関西大学哲学, 関西大学哲学, 25, 109 - 141, Oct. 2005 , Refereed

Books etc

  • Contextualizing Material Culture in South and Central Asia in Pre-Modern Times, Verena Widorn, Ute Franke and Petra Latschenberger, eds., Contributor, Powers of Altering Sanctuaries: The Excavation and Revival of Minor Rock-Cut Temples in the Western Deccan, Brepols,   2016 , 978-2-503-56642-9
  • Routledge Handbook of Heritage in Asia, Patrick Daly and Tim Winter, eds., Contributor, Ch.22. Asian Orientalism: Perceptions of Buddhist Heritage in Japan, pp.339-349, Routledge,   2012

Conference Activities & Talks

  • Majolica Tiles from Japan: India Modern and Nationalism in Colonial Architecture, Aki TOYOYAMA, Political Economy Tokyo Seminar,   2017 09 25 , 招待有り
  • Making the Most out of Conferences, Aki TOYOYAMA, HIstorians' Workshop,   2017 09 24 , 招待有り
  • Transaction and Translation of Modernity: Japanese Majolica Tiles in Colonial India, Aki TOYOYAMA, History of Consumer Culture 2017 Conference: Objects, Desire and Sociability,   2017 03 24
  • The Tiling of Indian Modernity: Japanese Majolica Tiles in Marwari Architecture, Aki TOYOYAMA, 45th Annual Conference on South Asia,   2016 10 21
  • The Tiling of Indian Modernity: Japanese Majolica Tiles in Marwari Architecture, Aki TOYOYAMA, 45th Annual Meeting of Southwest Conference on Asian Studies,   2016 10 15
  • Modernity, Hybridity, and New Identities: Architectural Representations of the 'Black Town' in Late Colonial Calcutta, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 4th International Congress of Bengal Studies,   2015 12 12 , Tokyo University of Foreign Languages
  • The Tiling of Indian Modernity: Japanese Majolica Tiles in Marwari Architecture, Aki TOYOYAMA, International Workshop "Representing Marwaris in 1920s-30s India",   2015 10 31 , Otemon Gakuin Osaka-Umeda Satellite
  • Japanese Majolica Tiles in Inter-war India: Modernization, Sanitization, and Beautification of the National Landscape, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 17th World Economic History Congress,   2015 08 03 , Kyoto International Conference Center
  • Japanese Majolica Tiles and National Aestheticism in Late Colonial Asia, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 9th International Convention of Asian Scholars,   2015 07 07 , Adelaide Convention Centre
  • Japanese Majolica Tiles in the Making of Indian Modernism and Nationalism, Aki TOYOYAMA, SNU-INDAS Conference,   2014 12 12 , India Habitat Centre
  • Aesthetics, Sanitation, and Nationalism: Japanese Majolica Tiles in Late Colonial India, Aki TOYOYAMA, Seminar Series of the Centre for South Asian Studies,   2014 10 23 , The University of Edinburgh
  • Majolica Tiles and Pan-Asianism in Interwar Japan, Aki TOYOYAMA, HISTART '13 Conference: Politics, Ideology, Identity,   2013 11 28 , Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University
  • The Cave Temples as the Imagining of India: The Negotiation between Early Modern Indian Tradition and Colonial Knowledge, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 33rd Congress of the International Committee of the History of Art,   2012 07 17 , Nuremberg Convention Center
  • The Marwari Haveli as Re-presentation of Colonial Modernity, Aki TOYOYAMA, The British Association of South Asian Studies Annual Conference,   2012 04 13 , SOAS, University of London
  • Environment and Sanctification in the Making of Cultural Landscape at the Caves of Pateshvar, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 20th International Conference on European Association of South Asian Archaeology,   2010 07 09 , University of Vienna
  • Indian Antiquities in Imagination, Empiricism and Scientism: A Reconsideration of Cave Temple Studies of the Imperial Intellect, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 21st Conference of the International Association of Historians of Asia,   2010 06 25 , River View Hotel (Singapore)
  • Cutting Practice on the Rock, Layering Sanctuaries on the Water: Assimilation and Reproduction of Tradition in the Western Deccan Caves, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 3rd International Conference on South and Southeast Asian Association for the Study of Culture and Religion,   2009 06 03 , Institut Seni Indonesia
  • The Reconstruction of Oriental Identity through Buddhist Heritage: The Study of Indian Cave Temples, Its Reaction and Interpretation in Asian Countries from the 19th Century till Today, Aki TOYOYAMA, The International Conference on Heritage in Asia: Converging Forces, Conflicting Values,   2009 01 09 , National University of Singapore
  • Through Ports, Passes, and Junctions: Reconsideration of the Excavational Patterns of Minor Buddhist Caves in Western India, Nobuo NAKATANI, Fumitaka YONADA, Akinori UESUGI, and Aki TOYOYAMA, The 19th International Conference on European Association of South Asian Archaeology,   2007 07 03 , Bologna University (Ravenna Section)
  • Buddhist Caves as a Symbol of Socio-economy: With Special Reference to Junnar Caves in India, Aki TOYOYAMA, The 2nd International Conference on South and Southeast Asian Association for the Study of Culture and Religion,   2007 05 27 , Mahidol Unversity

Misc

  • Imagined Traditions: India's Open-Air Art Gallery, Aki TOYOYAMA, Minpaku Monthly, 40, 8, 16, 17,   2016 08 , 招待有り
  • Haveli as Representation of the Colonial Experience: The Practice of Cultural Interaction of the Marwari Community in British India, 豊山 亜希, 239, 270,   2012 01 , http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/120005686841
    Summary:The examination of modernity in Asia is often accompanied by the evaluation of the colonial experience and its refl ection onpostcoloniality. Among Asian experience of colonialism, that of India may have infl uenced highly on the awakening of identity indiff erent levels of the world. Of various facets of colonial experience of India, this paper focuses on the mercantile community of India called Marwari. The recent development of Indian economy highly owed to conglomerates, among which not a few leading fi rms such as Birlas and Bajajs are from this community. Their ancestors left their homes in the barren region of Shekhawati in north India, and made their fortunes in the nineteenth-century colonial cities. From the early twentieth century, they gradually entered into industry and developed into conglomerates. While the preceding studies on the Marwari community have been led mainly by the fi elds of economic history and anthropology, aiming to understand the characteristics of their moral economy, this paper argues on their cultural practices from an art-historical perspective, particularly on their residential mansions called havelis.Living in humble style in colonial cities or their economic headquarters, the Marwaris spent their fortunes for philanthropicdeeds in the form of architectural projects such as havelis, temples, and wells in their hometowns of Shekhawati, dating between the1830s and 1930s. Famous for their colourful mural paintings, it has been generally considered that havelis were the visual spectacles of the Marwaris to show off their economic success to the eyes of their hometowns. It may be likely that havelis were cultural devices that were strategically created for self-representation of the Marwaris in thecolonial economy. However, it may be questionable to see the haveliconstruction of the Marwaris continued on the basis of a single intention for about a hundred years, even though colonial Indiaduring this period experienced drastic changes from British high imperialism to national movement. This paper attempts to see those changes through mural representations of havelis, thereby the characteri stics of colonialityin Asia and its refl ection on postcoloniality are substantiallyunderstood. The paper fi rstly defi nes as to who the Marwaris are. Secondly, the reason why the Marwaris invested their fortunes in the hometowns rather than the economic headquarters is argued. Thirdly, the mural paintings on havelis are analysed according to their subject matters, and those mural paintings and its relationwith contemporary visual culture are discussed. And lastly, the making of identity of the Marwari community in diff erent stages of colonial India is revealed.

Research Grants & Projects

  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists B, Modernity and Nationalism in the Murals of Merchant Houses in Colonial India, Aki TOYOYAMA