KINDAI UNIVERSITY


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Etsuko Shimo

Profile

FacultyGeneral Education Division
PositionAssociate Professor
Degree
Commentator Guidehttps://www.kindai.ac.jp/meikan/981-shimo-etsuko.html
URL
Mail
Last Updated :2019/09/04

Education and Career

Education

  •  - 2001 , State Univesity of NewYork, University at Buffalo, School of education, Department of Learning and Instruction, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
  •  - 1996 , Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Department of Foreign Studies, Anglo-American Studies

Academic & Professional Experience

  •   2010 04 ,  - 現在, Associate Professor, Kinki University Factulty of Applied Sociology
  •   2009 04 ,  - 2010 03 , Associate Professor, Kinki University Department of Language Education
  •   2007 04 ,  - 2009 03 , Lecturer, Kinki University Department of Language Education
  •   2003 ,  - 2007 , Miyazakimunicipal University, Faculty of
  •   2007 , - Kinki University, Department of Language Education
  •   2002 ,  - 2003 , Chubu University Part-time Lecturer
  •   2001 ,  - 2003 , Aichi Shukutoku University. Center for
  • Humarities Department of Intercultural Studies
  • Lecturer
  • Japanese Language and Culture, Part-time

Research Activities

Research Areas

  • Linguistics, Foreign language education

Research Interests

  • teacher beliefs, learner autonomy, collaborative learning activities, foreign language education policy., Learner autonomy, portfolio assessment, cooperative learning

Published Papers

  • Higher School Entrance Exams and Middle School Foreign Language Education in Meiji- and Taisho-Era Japan: The Case of Daiichi Koto Gakko, Etsuko Shimo, JALT Journal, 41(1), 27 - 48, May 2019 , Refereed
  • The 1898 Japan Middle School Principals National Convention: Teaching English or German?, SHIMO Etsuko, Language Policy, 15, 31 - 56, Mar. 2019 , Refereed
  • The Purposes of Foreign Language Education: Koto Kyoiku Kaigi and Foreign Language Education in Meiji Era Middle Schools, SHIMO Etsuko, Language Policy, 14, 29 - 54, 2018 , Refereed
  • English Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Personalities and Attitudes : Comparing English L1 and Japanese L1 Teachers, 下 絵津子, 近畿大学総合社会学部紀要 = Applied sociology research review Kinki University, 近畿大学総合社会学部紀要 = Applied sociology research review Kinki University, 4(2), 35 - 55, Mar. 2016
    Summary:日本の大学で1・2 年生の英語科目を教える教師を対象に、学生に関する教師ビリーフを探求するアンケート調査を2014 年に実施した。本稿では、アンケート調査結果をもとに、学生の性格や英語学習に対する態度、教室内での英語使用についての態度、授業の形態に関する好みに関して、教師がどのように認識しているかを、英語第一言語教師(ETs:154 名)と日本語第一言語教師(JTs:170 名)の間で比較分析した。その結果、「受身的」「素直」「恥ずかしがりや」といった認識に類似点が見られた一方、いくつかの相違点も観察された。「明るい」「英語でコミュニケーションを取りたがる」「どうしたら英語力が上がるかに関心がある」との認識のETs が多かったのに対して、JTs は「学習に真面目に取り組む」との回答が多かった。また、学生が学習者中心を好むのか、教師中心の教室を好むのかなどについても両グループで認識に差が見られた。これらの相違点を生み出した背景要因には、 (1)授業における目標スキルが異なっていること、(2)学生の教師に対する期待とその期待への教師の対応の間に存在する相互関係的状況要因、そして(3)授業における教師と学生、あるいは学生と学生同士の実際のやり取りの内容と量が関係している可能性が指摘される。majour: English Education
  • Teachers' Beliefs about English Learners at Universities in Japan : A Review of Previous Research and Findings from a Pilot Study, 下 絵津子, 近畿大学総合社会学部紀要 = Applied sociology research review Kinki University, 近畿大学総合社会学部紀要 = Applied sociology research review Kinki University, 3(2), 31 - 48, Jul. 2014
    Summary:(Abstract) The purposes of this paper are twofold: a) to discuss how previous researchers have explored teachers' beliefs in the field of second language education and b) to report the findings of a pilot survey conducted among Japanese university English teachers about their beliefs regarding Japanese learners of English at universities. First, I will review the definitions of teachers' beliefs and their roles in teaching practices. Teachers' beliefs can be a critical factor that makes a difference in the outcome of curriculum goals because of the potentially strong influences on individual teachers' instructional practices. Second, I will examine teachers' beliefs collected through a pilot questionnaire survey. Data were collected from six native English-speaking teachers (ETs) and eleven native Japanese-speaking teachers (JTs). The main purpose of the pilot study was to examine the questionnaire items for use in a larger-scale survey, and therefore a small group of teachers was selected. Despite its small scale, the survey revealed potential differences and similarities between ETs' and JT's beliefs about Japanese learners of English at universities in Japan: The findings indicated the possibility that the teachers share similar impressions of their students, but that their judgments and interpretations of the students' skills and attitudes toward learning English (i.e., motivations and preferences for class formats and activities) could be very different.専攻: 英語教育学, 修正箇所: 39ページ右欄30~33行目
  • Developing Can-Do Check Lists as a Self-Evaluation Tool for University-Level English Classes, Shimo Etsuko, Nitta Kaori, 近畿大学教養・外国語教育センター紀要. 外国語編, 近畿大学教養・外国語教育センター紀要. 外国語編, 2(1), 225 - 245, 2011
    Summary:著者専攻(下): 英語教育学, 著者専攻(新田): 英語教育学
  • Learner autonomy and English language proficiency: An exploration among non-English majors at a Japanese university, Shimo Etsuko, Kinki University Department of Language Education Bulletin, 近畿大学語学教育部紀要, 8(2), 153 - 178, 2008
    Summary:[Abstract] This study explored the following research questions: Are there any differences in the level of self-perceived learner autonomy depending on the students' proficiency level? If so, what differences are there? A self-reportquestionnaire was developed in order to gather data about students' learner autonomy levels. The questionnaire responses were collected from 106 non-English majors at a Japanese university in the 2007 fall semester. In addition to the questionnaire results, proficiency-test scores of the students were used for the analysis in the study. The analysis suggests the following points: 1) There are two factors in learner autonomy measured by the questionnaire: "orientation towards improving learning environment" and "orientation towards reflective learning." 2)The "orientation towards reflective learning" seems to be a better prediction of learners' higher proficiency. 3) In addition to proficiency level, a number of variables appear to explain differences in the students' learner autonomy level, including students' motivation, learning objectives, interest in language learning, and class atmosphere.
  • The Use of Portfolios in Second Language Education, Etsuko SHIMO, 宮崎公立大学人文学部紀要 = Bulletin of Miyazaki Municipal University Faculty of Humanities, 宮崎公立大学人文学部紀要 = Bulletin of Miyazaki Municipal University Faculty of Humanities, 14(1), 149 - 167, Mar. 20 2007
    Summary:ポートフォリオとは基本的には「ある目的のもとに学習者の作品などを収集したもの」であるが、それを有効に活用するためには、「収集・選択・内省」(Hamp-Lyons & Condon,2000)などの特徴を考慮しなければならない。本稿では、まず、語学教室においてポートフォリオを効果的に活用するためのこのような特徴を整理し、ヨーロッパ各国の第二言語教育において組織的なポートフォリオの導入を試みるヨーロッパ言語ポートフォリオ(ELP)を紹介する。さらに、「評価用ポートフォリオ」を利用した筆者の授業におけるその使用を考察し、日本の語学教室におけるポートフォリオの活用・普及にむけての課題を整理する。ポートフォリオは、学習者と教師の「協働評価」であり、その活用によって、両者が自らの活動に対して互いからフィードバックを受け取るという構図が実現できる。また、それは、学習者オートノミー、教師オートノミーを促進することにつながる。ELPプロジェクトがそうであるように、ポートフォリオ活用は語学教育にプラスの効果をもたらす可能性は非常に高い。そのようなポートフォリオ活用への理解を促進するために、また、日本の語学教室での効果的な活用方法をさらに吟味するために、日本の中学、高校、大学の語学教育の現場でのポートフォリオ活用例を集めることが必要だろう。普及にあたっては、その機能を明確化し、ポートフォリオの特徴の整理や、その活用の流れ、具体的な方法の提示が必須だと考える。
  • The Effective Use of Collaborative Shadowing Activities in Second Language Classrooms, SHIMO Etsuko, Bulletin of Miyazaki Municipal University Faculty of Humanities, 宮崎公立大学人文学部紀要, 13(1), 85 - 99, Mar. 20 2006
    Summary:This paper first introduces sample collaborative shadowing activities used in university-level English courses, discusses concepts to support these activities, and then explores their benefits and drawbacks based on instructor observations and student responses from an end-of-the-semester questionnaire survey and reflection essays on course activities. In a collaborative shadowing activity, a student shares his or her written work orally and the partner repeats his or her words in the form of a dialogue. This activity, termed dialogue-formed shadowing, provides ample opportunities for students to expose themselves to input, to produce output, and to have interaction with each other and receive more feedback on their output, helping to create a cooperative and autonomous learning space. Such practice with nonnative speaker classmates allows students to become aware of the benefits of practicing with non-native speakers. This study shows that a large number of students identified benefits of collaborative shadowing activities. Students found it fun to speak with classmates and to know more about their fellow classmates. They enjoyed communicating with classmates in English, sharing personal stories, and learning from each other. Collaborative shadowing was a new way of practicing the language for them; they reported that shadowing activities provided good listening and speaking practice. However, a few problems were pointed out such as a) repetition of classmates' errors and mistakes, b) uncertainty of correct pronunciation, and c) negative emotions about their own writing. This paper will suggest a few teaching tools and techniques to deal with problems. In the end, this study has raised two issues to be explored in the future. One is whether collaborative shadowing works for a certain type of student group or not, and the other is how the teacher's instructions in shadowing activities change students' performances and their consequent effects upon language learning.
  • The Effective Use of Collaborative Shadowing Activities in Second Language Classrooms, Etsuko SHIMO, 宮崎公立大学人文学部紀要 = Bulletin of Miyazaki Municipal University Faculty of Humanities, 宮崎公立大学人文学部紀要 = Bulletin of Miyazaki Municipal University Faculty of Humanities, 13(1), 85 - 99, Mar. 20 2006
    Summary:This paper first introduces sample collaborative shadowing activities used in university-level English courses, discusses concepts to support these activities, and then explores their benefits and drawbacks based on instructor observations and student responses from an end-of-the-semester questionnaire survey and reflection essays on course activities. In a collaborative shadowing activity, a student shares his or her written work orally and the partner repeats his or her words in the form of a dialogue. This activity, termed dialogue-formed shadowing, provides ample opportunities for students to expose themselves to input, to produce output, and to have interaction with each other and receive more feedback on their output, helping to create a cooperative and autonomous learning space. Such practice with nonnative speaker classmates allows students to become aware of the benefits of practicing with non-native speakers. This study shows that a large number of students identified benefits of collaborative shadowing activities. Students found it fun to speak with classmates and to know more about their fellow classmates. They enjoyed communicating with classmates in English, sharing personal stories, and learning from each other. Collaborative shadowing was a new way of practicing the language for them; they reported that shadowing activities provided good listening and speaking practice. However, a few problems were pointed out such as a) repetition of classmates' errors and mistakes, b) uncertainty of correct pronunciation, and c) negative emotions about their own writing. This paper will suggest a few teaching tools and techniques to deal with problems. In the end, this study has raised two issues to be explored in the future. One is whether collaborative shadowing works for a certain type of student group or not, and the other is how the teacher's instructions in shadowing activities change students' performances and their consequent effects upon language learning.

Books etc

  • A Can-Do framework based curriculum in a university-level English language learning program: Course goals, activities, and assessment. , SHIMO Etsuko, RAMIRES Carlos, NITTA Kaori, Joint Work, In F. O'Dwyer, M. Hunke, A. Imig, N. Nagai, N. Naganuma, M. Schmidt (Eds.). (2017). Critical, constructive assessment of CEFR-informed language teaching in Japan and beyond, English Profile Studies, volume 6 (pp. 118-154)., Cambridge (UK): Cambridge University Press. ,   2017
  • Teacher and learner autonomy in Japan, Vol. 1: Autonomy you ask! [A. Barfield & M. Nix (Eds.)] (pp. 175-186), JALT Learner Development SIG,   2006 , 4931424295
  • 『多文化の時代 衝突と対応』 (pp.12-32), 宮崎公立大学・鉱脈社,   2004 , 860611148
  • Teacher and learner autonomy in Japan, Vol. 2: More of autonomy you ask![E. Skier and M. Kohyama (Eds.)] (pp.49-60), JALT Learner Development SIG,   2006 , 4931424163

Conference Activities & Talks

  • Teachers’ Perceptions of Their Students’ English Abilities and Attitudes Towards Learning English: A Comparison of English L1 and Japanese L1 Teachers, SHIMO Etsuko, The Fifth International Language in Focus Conference,   2018 05 05
  • How do Japanese-university English learners look to you?, SHIMO Etsuko, JALT Nara Chapter Meeting,   2015 10 04
  • Exploring Japanese university English teachers’ beliefs about their students’ characteristics, SHIMO Etsuko, JACET 54th International Conference,   2015 08 29
  • Exploring Japanese university English teachers’ beliefs about their students, SHIMO Etsuko, ClaSIC,   2014 12
  • English Teachers’ Beliefs: A Review of Previous Research and Findings from a Pilot Study, SHIMO Etsuko, JACET 53rd International Conference,   2014 08
  • Exploration into language teachers’ beliefs in the field of second language teaching, SHIMO Etsuko, JALT PanSIG 2014,   2014 05
  • Review of a can-do-framework-based curriculum in a university-level English language learning program: course goals, activities and assessment, SHIMO Etsuko, JALT PLF SIG Symposium,   2014 05
  • Collaborative Learning Activities and Motivation for Learning English, SHIMO Etsuko,   2013 11
  • Collaborating with science students about their EFL motivation, Matthew Apple, Glen Hill, Joseph Falout, Etsuko Shimo, JACET 52nd International Conference,   2013 08
  • Student power: Portfolio assessment in an EFL writing class, Asia TEFL,   2007 06 , Asia TEFL
  • The Role of Cooperative Learning in Promoting Learner Autonomy,   2007 10
  • Implementation of Writing Tests for First-year University Students by Use of “Criterion”,   2010 11

Misc

  • 〈Study Report 1〉English Class Activities Promoting Learner Autonomy and Cooperative Learning, 下 絵津子, 語学教育部ジャーナル = Kinki University Department of Language Education journal, 6, 177, 184,   2010 03 01 , http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/120005730302
    Summary:語学教育部第1回FD研究会, 日時: 2009年2月20日(金)14:00~17:00, 場所: 15号館1階マルチメディア教室, 参加者: 48名(専任42名、非常勤6名), 著者専攻: 言語教育学
  • A report on the visit to Kyushu Sangyo University: A Program for Distinctive University Education, Koch Thomas, 語学教育部ジャーナル = Kinki University Department of Language Education journal, 5, 129, 139,   2009 03 01 , http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/120005730314
    Summary:著者専攻(新田): 応用言語学・英語教育学, 著者専攻(トーマス・クック): 英語教育学, 著者専攻(下): 言語教育学
  • The Use of Portfolios in Second Language Education, SHIMO Etsuko, Bulletin of Miyazaki Municipal University Faculty of Humanities, 14, 1, 149, 167,   2006 , http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/110006458010
    Summary:ポートフォリオとは基本的には「ある目的のもとに学習者の作品などを収集したもの」であるが、それを有効に活用するためには、「収集・選択・内省」(Hamp-Lyons & Condon,2000)などの特徴を考慮しなければならない。本稿では、まず、語学教室においてポートフォリオを効果的に活用するためのこのような特徴を整理し、ヨーロッパ各国の第二言語教育において組織的なポートフォリオの導入を試みるヨーロッパ言語ポートフォリオ(ELP)を紹介する。さらに、「評価用ポートフォリオ」を利用した筆者の授業におけるその使用を考察し、日本の語学教室におけるポートフォリオの活用・普及にむけての課題を整理する。ポートフォリオは、学習者と教師の「協働評価」であり、その活用によって、両者が自らの活動に対して互いからフィードバックを受け取るという構図が実現できる。また、それは、学習者オートノミー、教師オートノミーを促進することにつながる。ELPプロジェクトがそうであるように、ポートフォリオ活用は語学教育にプラスの効果をもたらす可能性は非常に高い。そのようなポートフォリオ活用への理解を促進するために、また、日本の語学教室での効果的な活用方法をさらに吟味するために、日本の中学、高校、大学の語学教育の現場でのポートフォリオ活用例を集めることが必要だろう。普及にあたっては、その機能を明確化し、ポートフォリオの特徴の整理や、その活用の流れ、具体的な方法の提示が必須だと考える。
  • Small-group presentation activities in the English classroom, 下 絵津子, Kinki University Center for Liberal Arts and Foreign Language Education journal Foreign language edition, 1, 1, 133, 149,   2010 , http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/120005729470
    Summary:著者専攻: 英語教育学
  • Student Reactions to Extensive Reading: A Comparison of Three Japanese University English Classes, 下 絵津子, Kinki University Department of Language Education bulletin, 9, 1, 1, 19,   2009 , http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/120005730005
    Summary:[Abstract] This study explored the following research questions in English classes at a university in Japan: Are there any differences among student reactions to Extensive Reading (ER) in three different classes? If so, what kinds of differences are apparent? Student reactions were collected through questionnaire surveys from two Science Engineering major classes, where out-of-class ER assignments were given, and one Arts major class, in which in-class ER activities were done. In addition to the students' responses to the surveys, the teacher's records of students' out-of-class work (i.e., book reports) and of observation of students' engagement in in-class reading activities were examined. The findings of this study included the following: (1) Even students with similar backgrounds showed different reactions to ER; and (2) students showed different reactions to ER when the required ER assignments or activities were different. The study suggests that it is important to help students to develop the habit of reading extensively from the very beginning of the academic year, and that in-class reading activities can serve as an effective trigger for students to begin experiencing the joy of reading. These activities seem especially beneficial for less motivated students who are not willing to study outside the class.執筆者専攻: 言語教育学
  • Dynamics of learner autonomy: Components and changes, 11, 33, 49,   2009
  • Cooperative learning in an EFL writing course: A step toward motivation and autonomy, Learner Development: Context, Curricula, Connections, Proceedings of the Kobe Conference, 25, 33
  • Japanese learners of English: their beliefs about listening skills and their use of listening strategies, Unpublishied master's Thesis,   2001
  • Learners to teacher: “Portfolios, please!”: Students’ perceptions of portfolio assessment in EFL classrooms, M. Apple, & E. Shimo, JALT PAN-SIG2004 Proceedings, on line,   2005
  • Learners' affect and learning of listening comprehension skills, The Proceedings of JALT 2002, 29, 35,   2003
  • Learning listening comprehension skills in English: the analysis of Japanese learners' beliefs and its implications, The Language Teacher, 26, 10, 15, 18,   2002
  • Let's learn to write better through collaboration!, JALT 2004 Proceedings, 1147, 1157,   2005
  • Student empowerment through portfolio and cooperative learning activities, Kinki University, Department of Language Education Journal, 4, 91, 103,   2008
  • Student empowerment through portfolio and cooperative learning activities, Kinki University, Department of Language Education Journal, 4,   2008
  • The effective use of collaborative shadowing activities in second language classrooms, 宮崎公立大学人文学部紀要, 13, 1, 85, 99,   2005
    Summary:2005年度
  • 九州産業大学の特色ある大学教育支援プログラムについての視察報告, 新田香織・Tom Koch・下 絵津子, 語学教育部ジャーナル, 5, 129, 139,   2009
  • 小学校英語学習経験者の追跡調査と小・中英語教育への示唆, 樋口忠彦、国方太司、大村吉弘、田邉義隆、下 絵津子、泉惠美子、衣笠知子、加賀田哲也、箱崎雄子, 英語教育増刊号, 58, 69,   2008
  • 第二言語教育におけるポートフォリオの活用, 宮崎公立大学人文学部紀要, 14, 1, 149, 167,   2006
  • 英語リーディングへのアプローチ-ある授業の考察から-, 宮崎公立大学開学10周年記念論文集 宮崎~九州~アジア:地域に根ざして, 249, 264,   2004

Research Grants & Projects

  • Ordinary Research, Learner development
  • Ordinary Research, Portfolio use in language classrooms