KINDAI UNIVERSITY


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DOI Hiroshi

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FacultyDepartment of Medicine
PositionLecturer
DegreePh.D. in Medicine
Commentator Guidehttps://www.kindai.ac.jp/meikan/2210-doi-hiroshi.html
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Last Updated :2020/09/30

Education and Career

Academic & Professional Experience

  •   2020 04 ,  - 現在, Lecturer/ Junior Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kindai University Faculty of Medicine
  •   2017 07 ,  - 2020 03 , Assistant professor/ Lecturer, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kindai University Faculty of Medicine
  •   2016 04 ,  - 2017 06 , Director, Department of Radiation Oncology, Meiwa Cancer Clinic
  •   2011 04 ,  - 2016 03 , Assistant professor, Department of Radiology, Hyogo College of Medicine
  •   2012 05 ,  - 2013 06 , Visiting Scholar, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine

Research Activities

Published Papers

  • Dose–volume histogram analysis of knowledge-based volumetric-modulated arc therapy planning in postoperative breast cancer irradiation., Inoue E, Doi H, Monzen H, Tamura M, Inada M, Ishikawa K, Nakamatsu K, Nishimura Y, In Vivo, In Vivo, 34(3), 1095 - 1101, May 2020 , Refereed
  • Impact of preoperative chemoradiotherapy using concurrent S-1 and CPT-11 on long-term clinical outcomes in locally advanced rectal cancer., Kimura K, Beppu N, Doi H, Kataoka K, Yamano T, Uchino M, Ikeda M, Ikeuchi H, Tomita N, World Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology, World Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology, 12(3), 311 - 322, Mar. 2020 , Refereed
  • Feasibility of using tungsten functional paper as a thin bolus for electron beam radiotherapy., Takei Y, Monzen H, Tamura M, Doi H, Nishimura Y, Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, In press, 2020 , Refereed
  • Irinotecan and gemcitabine as second-line treatment in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma following platinum plus pemetrexed chemotherapy: A retrospective study., Koda Y, Kuribayashi K, Doi H, Kitajima K, Nakajima Y, Ishigaki H, Nakamura A, Minami T, Takahashi R, Yokoi T, Kijima T, Oncology, Oncology, In press, 2020 , Refereed
  • Intensity-modulated radiation therapy administered to a previously irradiated spine is effective and well tolerated., Doi H, Tamari K, Masai N, Akino Y, Tatsumi D, Shiomi H, Oh RJ., Clinical and Translational Oncology, Clinical and Translational Oncology, In press, 2020 , Refereed
  • Development of a novel prognostic risk classification system for malignant pleural mesothelioma., Doi H, Kuribayashi K, Kitajima K, Yamakado K, Kijima T, Clinical Lung Cancer, Clinical Lung Cancer, 21(1), 66 - 74, Jan. 2020 , Refereed
  • Estimation of radiation shielding ability in electron therapy and brachytherapy with real time variable shape tungsten rubber., Monzen H, Tamura M, Kijima K, Otsuka M, Matsumoto K, Wakabayashi K, Choi MG, Yoon DK, Doi H, Akiyama H, Nishimura Y, Physica Medica: European Journal of Medical Physics, Physica Medica: European Journal of Medical Physics, 66, 29 - 35, Oct. 2019 , Refereed
  • Couch Modeling Optimization for Tomotherapy Planning and Delivery., Okada W, Tanooka M, Sano K, Shibata M, Doi H, Miyazaki M, Nakahara R, Sueoka M, Suzuki H, Fujiwara M, Inomata T, Yamakado K, Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics., Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics., 20(8), 114 - 121, Aug. 2019 , Refereed
  • Stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial pneumonia: A review., Hiroshi Doi, Kiyoshi Nakamatsu, Yasumasa Nishimura, International Journal of Clinical Oncology, International Journal of Clinical Oncology, 24(8), 899 - 909, Aug. 2019 , Refereed
  • Variations of the Dose Distribution Between CT- and CBCT-based Plans for Oropharyngeal Cancer., Otsuka M, Monzen H, Ishikawa K, Doi H, Matsumoto K, Tamura M, Nishimura Y, In Vivo, In Vivo, 33(4), 1271 - 1277, Jul. 2019 , Refereed
  • Lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with prostate cancer under and after intensity-modulated radiation therapy., Hayama Y, Doi H, Hasegawa T, Minami Y, Ichimura N, Koike M, Shiomi H, Oh RJ, Oishi F, Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, 11(2), O127 - O134, Apr. 2019 , Refereed
  • Improved error detection using a divided treatment plan in volume modulated arc therapy., Tarutani K, Tanooka M, Doi H, Fujiwara M, Miyashita M, Kagawa K, Kamikonya N, Yamakado K, Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy, 24(2), 133 - 144, Mar. 2019 , Refereed
  • Types of surgery post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy for pleural mesothelioma., Kuribayashi K, Doi H, Kijima T, Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, 13(12), 1189 - 1194, 2019 , Refereed
  • Clinical T staging is superior to fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for predicting local outcomes after intra-arterial infusion chemoradiotherapy for maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma., Doi H, Fujiwara M, Kitajima K, Tanooka M, Terada T, Noguchi K, Ishikura R, Kamikonya N, Yamakado K, Nagoya Journal of Medical Science, Nagoya Journal of Medical Science, 80(4), 541 - 550, Nov. 2018 , Refereed
  • Mechanical performance of a commercial knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer., Tamura M, Monzen H, Matsumoto K, Kubo K, Otsuka M, Inada M, Doi H, Ishikawa K, Nakamatsu K, Sumida I, Mizuno H, Yoon DK, Nishimura Y, Radiation Oncology, Radiation Oncology, 13(1), 163, Aug. 2018 , Refereed
  • Assessment of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy and predicting prognosis in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by PERCIST., Katsuura T, Kitajima K, Fujiwara M, Terada T, Uwa N, Noguchi K, Doi H, Tamaki Y, Yoshida R, Tsuchitani T, Fujita M, Yamakado K, Annals of Nuclear Medicine, Annals of Nuclear Medicine, 32(7), 453 - 462, Aug. 2018 , Refereed
  • Utility of polaprezinc in reducing toxicities during radiotherapy: A literature review, Doi H, Kuribayashi K, Kijima T, Future Oncology, Future Oncology, 14(19), 1977 - 1988, Aug. 2018 , Refereed
  • Double cancer comprising malignant pleural mesothelioma and squamous cell carcinoma of the lung treated with radiotherapy: A case report., Negi Y, Kuribayashi K, Doi H, Funaguchi N, Koda Y, Fujimoto E, Mikami K, Minami T, Yokoi T, Kijima T, Molecular and Clinical Oncology, Molecular and Clinical Oncology, 9, 181 - 186, Jun. 2018 , Refereed
  • Reduction of potential risk for the skin toxicity in megavoltage radiotherapy with a novel rigid couch., Tamura M, Monzen H, Matsumoto K, Okumura M, Doi H, Nishimura Y, In Vivo, In Vivo, 32(3), 531 - 536, May 2018 , Refereed
  • Definitive re-irradiation using intensity modulated radiation therapy in cancers of the head and neck, focusing on rare tumors., Doi H, Uemoto K, Masai N, Tatsumi D, Shiomi H, Oh RJ, Acta Oto-Laryngologica, Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 138(8), 750 - 758, Feb. 2018 , Refereed
  • Early stage clinical characterization of malignant pleural mesothelioma., Negi Y, Kuribayashi K, Funaguchi N, Doi H, Mikami K, Minami T, Takuwa T, Yokoi T, Hasegawa S, Kijima T, In Vivo, In Vivo, 32, 1169 - 1174, 2018 , Refereed
  • Development of a three-dimensional surgical navigation system with magnetic resonance angiography and a three-dimensional printer for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy., Jomoto W, Tanooka M, Doi H, Kikuchi K, Mitsuie C, Yamada Y, Suzuki T, Yamano T, Ishikura R, Kotoura N, Yamamoto S, Cureus, Cureus, 10(1), e2018, Jan. 2018 , Refereed
  • Clinical implications of a novel, iron-containing fiducial marker in radiotherapy for liver tumors: an initial experience., Doi H, Harui S, Nakajima H, Ando A, Kamino K, Fujiwara M, Nakajima T, Ikura S, Aihara T, Yamanaka N, Cureus, Cureus, 9(12), e1902, Dec. 2017 , Refereed
  • Physical verification of automatic collation using the iron-containing fiducial marker in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver cancer., Harui S, Doi H, Kamino K, Sugimoto A, Ozaki Y, Taruoka T, Meiwa Igaku Journal, Meiwa Igaku Journal, 4, 94 - 99, 2017 , Refereed
  • A novel iron-containing fiducial marker in liver radiotherapy, Hiroshi Doi, Jpn J Clin Radiol., Jpn J Clin Radiol., 62(9), 1165 - 1171, 2017 , Refereed
  • Patterns of Local Recurrence and Oncologic Outcomes in T3 Low Rectal Cancer (ae<currency>5 cm from the Anal Verge) Treated With Short-Course Radiotherapy With Delayed Surgery, Naohito Beppu, Fumihiko Kimura, Tsukasa Aihara, Hiroshi Doi, Naohiro Tomita, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, ANNALS OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY, ANNALS OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY, 24(1), 219 - 226, Jan. 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Short-course radiotherapy with delayed surgery (SRT-delay) is still under clinical investigation for its efficacy in treating low rectal cancer (ae<currency>5 cm from the anal verge). This study was designed to assess the pattern of local recurrence and oncologic outcomes in T3 low rectal cancer treated with SRT-delay. This study enrolled T3 low rectal cancer patients without distant metastasis between 2003 and 2015. All patients received total mesorectal excision following SRT-delay (25 Gy/10 fractions/5 days + S-1 radiosensitizer with a 4-week delay of surgery). The median follow-up period was 69 (range 1-149) months. A total 119 consecutive patients had low rectal cancer; 104 (87.4 %) underwent intersphincteric resection (ISR), and 15 (12.6 %) underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR). Fifty-six patients (47.1 %) were ypT-downstaged, 86 (72.2 %) were ypN0, and 10 (8.4 %) had circumferential resection margin involvement. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival were 93.0, 76.2, and 80.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced local recurrence: lateral pelvic recurrence in six patients (5.0 %) and central pelvic recurrence in three (2.5 %). A total of 87.4 % of sphincter-preserving surgeries were performed for T3 low rectal cancer following SRT-delay. Pathological tumor downstaging, circumferential resection margin involvement, local recurrence, and oncologic outcomes were acceptable; therefore, the SRT-delay regimen may be an option for treating T3 low rectal cancer.
  • The short-term outcomes of induction SOX (S-1+oxaliplatin) +/- A cetuximab chemotherapy followed by short-course chemoradiotherapy in patients with poor-risk locally advanced rectal cancer, Naohito Beppu, Hidenori Yoshie, Fumihiko Kimura, Tsukasa Aihara, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Nagahide Matsubara, Naohiro Tomita, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, SURGERY TODAY, SURGERY TODAY, 46(10), 1123 - 1131, Oct. 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:To evaluate the safety and efficacy of induction SOX (S-1 + oxaliplatin) +/- A cetuximab chemotherapy followed by short-course chemoradiotherapy and surgery in patients with poor-risk locally advanced rectal cancer. We enrolled eligible patients with poor-risk rectal cancer defined as T3 lower rectal cancer with mesorectal fascia involvement, T4a or T4b tumors or cases with lateral lymph node swelling. The primary endpoint was a pathological complete response (pCR), and the secondary endpoints were the objective response rate (ORR) and the pathological high response rate (Grade 2 plus 3). Twenty eligible patients were enrolled. The majority (75.0 %, 15/20) of the patients completed four cycles of induction chemotherapy, and all patients completed the radiotherapy (25 Gy/10 fractions/5 days). The global rate of Grade 3-4 toxicities was 30.0 % (6/20 patients). The ORRs were 85.0 % (17/20) and 95.0 % (19/20) in the patients who underwent R0 and R1 resection, respectively. The pathological high response rate was 70.0 % (14/20) and the pCR was 10.0 % (2/20). The regimen of induction SOX (S-1 + oxaliplatin) +/- A cetuximab chemotherapy followed by short-course chemoradiotherapy is safe and is associated with good tumor regression in patients with poor-risk locally advanced rectal cancer.
  • Polaprezinc protects normal intestinal epithelium against exposure to ionizing radiation in mice., Odawara S, Doi H, Shikata T, Kitajima K, Suzuki H, Niwa Y, Kosaka K, Tarutani K, Tsujimura T, Kamikonya N, Hirota S, Molecular and clinical oncology, Molecular and clinical oncology, 5(4), 377 - 381, Oct. 2016 , Refereed
  • Outcomes and toxicity of radiotherapy for refractory bone and soft tissue sarcomas., Doi H, Oh RJ, Miura H, Masai N, Shiomi H, Inoue T, Molecular and clinical oncology, Molecular and clinical oncology, 4(1), 83 - 88, Jan. 2016 , Refereed
  • Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy using irinotecan plus S-1 for rectal cancer., Doi H, Beppu N, Kato T, Noda M, Yanagi H, Tomita N, Kamikonya N, Hirota S, Molecular and clinical oncology, Molecular and clinical oncology, 3(5), 1129 - 1134, Sep. 2015 , Refereed
  • Polaprezinc reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients., Doi H, Fujiwara M, Suzuki H, Niwa Y, Nakayama M, Shikata T, Odawara S, Takada Y, Kimura T, Kamikonya N, Hirota S, Molecular and clinical oncology, Molecular and clinical oncology, 3(2), 381 - 386, Mar. 2015 , Refereed
  • Histopathological Evidence for Irradiation Angiopathy in Head and Neck Cancer., Uwa N, Hao H, Tsukamoto Y, Terada T, Sagawa K, Mohri T, Daimon T, Doi H, Sotsuka Y, van Eys G, Bochaton-Piallat ML, Hirota S, Sakagami M, International Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, International Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, 4, 108 - 114, 2015 , Refereed
  • DICOM-RT Plan Complexity Verification for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy., Miura M, Tanooka M, Inoue H, Fujiwara M, Kosaka K, Doi H, Takada Y, Odawara S, Kamikonya N, Hirota S, International Journal of Medical Physics, Clinical Engineering and Radiation Oncology, International Journal of Medical Physics, Clinical Engineering and Radiation Oncology, 3(3), 117 - 124, Aug. 2014 , Refereed
  • Predicting Delivery Error Using a DICOM-RT Plan for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy., Miura M, Tanooka M, Fujiwara M, Takada Y, Doi H, Odawara S, Kosaka K, Kamikonya N, Hirota S, International Journal of Medical Physics, Clinical Engineering and Radiation Oncology, International Journal of Medical Physics, Clinical Engineering and Radiation Oncology, 3(2), 82 - 87, May 2014 , Refereed
  • Radioprotection and cell cycle arrest of intestinal epithelial cells by darinaparsin, a tumor radiosensitizer., Tian J, Doi H, Saar M, Santos J, Li X, Peehl DM, Knox SJ, International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics, International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics, 87(5), 1179 - 1185, Dec. 2013 , Refereed
  • A novel preoperative protocol for locally advanced rectal cancer: Hyperfractionated short-course radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy, Doi Hiroshi, Beppu Naohito, Takada Yasuhiro, Niwa Yasue, Fujiwara Masayuki, Kimura Fumihiko, Yanagi Hidenori, Yamanaka Naoki, Kamikonya Norihiko, Hirota Shozo, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 31(4), Feb. 01 2013 , Refereed
  • Multimodal treatment for undiferentiated carcinoma of the lacrimal sac., Doi H, Fujiwara M, Takada Y, Niwa Y, Kamikonya N, Tonooka M, Ito T, Terada T, Kakibuchi M, Hirota S, World Journal of Surgical Medical and Radiation Oncology, World Journal of Surgical Medical and Radiation Oncology, 1(18), 91 - 96, 2012 , Refereed
  • Low-dose aspirin therapy does not increase the severity of acute radiation proctitis., Doi H, Kamikonya N, Takada Y, Fujiwara M, Tsuboi K, Miura H, Inoue H, Tanooka M, Nakamura T, Shikata T, Kimura T, Tsujimura T, Hirota S, World Journal of Oncology, World Journal of Oncology, 3(4), 173 - 181, 2012 , Refereed
  • Impact of Planning CT Slice Thickness on the Accuracy of Automatic Target Registration Using the On-board Cone-beam CT, Hiroyuki Inoue, Masao Tanooka, Hiroshi Doi, Hideharu Miura, Hideo Nakagawa, Toshiyuki Sakai, Masahiko Oda, Katsumi Yasumasa, Kiyoshi Sakamoto, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, Japanese Journal of Medical Physics (Igakubutsuri), Japanese Journal of Medical Physics (Igakubutsuri), 31(1), 2 - 11, Aug. 2011 , Refereed
  • Adenosine Deaminase in Pleural Effusion and Its Relationship with Clinical Parameters in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma, Yasuhiro Nakajima, Kozo Kuribayashi, Hirotoshi Ishigaki, Akio Tada, Yoshiki Negi, Toshiyuki Minami, Ryo Takahashi, Hiroshi Doi, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Takashi Yokoi, Takashi Kijima, Cancer Investigation, Cancer Investigation, 38(6), 356 - 364, Jul. 02 2020 , Refereed
  • Dose-volume histogram analysis and clinical evaluation of knowledge-based plans with manual objective constraints for pharyngeal cancer., Takuya Uehara, Hajime Monzen, Mikoto Tamura, Kazuki Ishikawa, Hiroshi Doi, Yasumasa Nishimura, Journal of radiation research, Journal of radiation research, 61(3), 499 - 505, May 22 2020 , Refereed
    Summary:The present study aimed to evaluate whether knowledge-based plans (KBP) from a single optimization could be used clinically, and to compare dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and plan quality between KBP with (KBPCONST) and without (KBPORIG) manual objective constraints and clinical manual optimized (CMO) plans for pharyngeal cancer. KBPs were produced from a system trained on clinical plans from 55 patients with pharyngeal cancer who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For another 15 patients, DVH parameters of KBPCONST and KBPORIG from a single optimization were compared with CMO plans with respect to the planning target volume (D98%, D50%, D2%), brainstem maximum dose (Dmax), spinal cord Dmax, parotid gland median and mean dose (Dmed and Dmean), monitor units and modulation complexity score for VMAT. The Dmax of spinal cord and brainstem and the Dmed and Dmean of ipsilateral parotid glands were unacceptably high for KBPORIG, although the KBPCONST DVH parameters met our goal for most patients. KBPCONST and CMO plans produced comparable DVH parameters. The monitor units of KBPCONST were significantly lower than those of the CMO plans (P < 0.001). Dose distribution of the KBPCONST was better than or comparable to that of the CMO plans for 13 (87%) of the 15 patients. In conclusion, KBPORIG was found to be clinically unacceptable, while KBPCONST from a single optimization was comparable or superior to CMO plans for most patients with head and neck cancer.
  • Experimental Animal Model of Re-irradiation to Evaluate Radiation-induced Damage in the Normal Intestine., Hiroshi Doi, Mikoto Tamura, Kiyoshi Nakamatsu, Hajime Monzen, Yasumasa Nishimura, Anticancer research, Anticancer research, 40(4), 1981 - 1988, Apr. 2020 , Refereed
    Summary:BACKGROUND/AIM: We aimed to elucidate the pathological findings following acute and late re-irradiation in a preclinical model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were divided into five treatment groups: sham-irradiation (Sham-IR), 10-12 Gy (Single IR Acute), 15 Gy (Single IR Late), 15 Gy followed by 10-12 Gy re-irradiation 7 days later (Re-IR Acute), or 15 Gy followed by 10-12 Gy re-irradiation 12 weeks later (Re-IR Late). Mice were sacrificed after either single irradiation or re-irradiation for pathological assessment. RESULTS: The Re-IR Late group had significantly lower numbers of crypts with apoptotic cells than those observed in mice in the Single IR Acute group. There were no significant differences between the Single IR Acute and re-IR Acute groups in cell proliferation or in a crypt survival assay. CONCLUSION: Re-irradiation with a long interval after the first irradiation may cause similar acute biological effects in normal intestine as observed following irradiation without re-irradiation.
  • Patterns of bone metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma., Ayako Suzuki, Nobuo Kashiwagi, Hiroshi Doi, Kazunari Ishii, Katsumi Doi, Mutsukazu Kitano, Takenori Kozuka, Tomoko Hyodo, Masakatsu Tsurusaki, Yukinobu Yagyu, Katsuyuki Nakanishi, Auris, nasus, larynx, Auris, nasus, larynx, 47(2), 262 - 267, Apr. 2020 , Refereed
    Summary:OBJECTIVE: To report clinical features of bone metastases (BM) from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). METHODS: Among 772 patients with HNSCC diagnosed at our hospital over 9 years, 30 patients (3.9%) had clinical evidence of BM (24 men and 6 women; mean age: 63 years). We assessed the time interval from the primary diagnosis to BM development, symptoms attributable to BM, presence of distant metastases to other organs, number of BM, sites of BM, morphologic changes on computed tomography (CT) images, treatment for BM, and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: BM at the initial stage were found in 9 patients with HNSCC (30%), and in 21 patients (70%) with HNSCC during the course of the disease. In the later patients, the median time interval from the primary diagnosis was 11.5 months. Nineteen patients (63%) did not have BM-related symptoms, 6 (20%) had pain, 3 (10%) had neurologic symptoms resulting from vertebral or skull metastases, and 2 (7%) had hypercalcemia. Seventeen patients (57%) showed bone-exclusive metastases, and 13 (43%) had distant metastases in other organs. Eleven patients (37%) had monostotic metastases (solitary BM), and 19 patients (63%) had polyostotic metastases (multiple BM). When combined, 9 patients (30%) showed bone-exclusive and monostotic metastases. The most commonly affected site was the thoracolumbar spine, accounting for 34% of total BM, followed by the pelvis (24%), shoulder and thorax (21%), and the extremities (17%). Notably, metastases to bones above the clavicle (craniofacial bones and cervical spine) accounted for only 3% of all bone lesions. CT images showed variable morphologic patterns with osteolytic type in 17 patients (57%), intertrabecular in 7 (23%), osteoblastic in 4 (13%), and mixed in 2 (7%). Systematic chemotherapy for BM was performed in 19 patients and radiotherapy in 18. The median survival time for patients with bone-exclusive and monostotic metastases was significantly longer than that for patients with multi-organ metastases or polyostotic metastases at 18.2 months vs. 5.7 months (p=0.02). Neither chemotherapy nor radiotherapy extended OS. CONCLUSION: Thirty percent of BM cases from HNSCC showed bone-exclusive and monostotic metastases. These patients tended to show a more favorable prognosis than patients with multi-organ metastases or polyostotic metastases.
  • Comparing the 7th and 8th editions of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control TNM staging system for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy., Masahiro Inada, Yasumasa Nishimura, Kazuki Ishikawa, Kiyoshi Nakamatsu, Yutaro Wada, Takuya Uehara, Kohei Fukuda, Shimpei Anami, Hiroshi Doi, Shuichi Kanamori, Esophagus : official journal of the Japan Esophageal Society, Esophagus : official journal of the Japan Esophageal Society, 16(4), 371 - 376, Oct. 2019 , Refereed
    Summary:BACKGROUND: We retrospectively compared the 7th and the 8th editions of The American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) TNM classification in the cohort of survival of the patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) treated by definitive radiotherapy. METHODS: We included in this study 403 patients with ESCC who underwent radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, at a total radiation dose of ≥ 50 Gy with curative intent from 2000 to 2016 at Kindai University Hospital, and who had no distant metastasis (excluding supraclavicular lymph node). The same patient data set was re-staged according to both the 7th and 8th editions of AJCC/UICC TNM classification. RESULTS: For the 7th edition, 5-year overall survival (OS) for stages I, II, III, and IV were 58%, 52%, 22%, and 12%, respectively, which seemed to be separable into two groups (Stages I-II and III-IV). In the 8th edition, corresponding values for stages I, II, III, and IV were 65%, 44%, 34%, and 16%, respectively, which seemed to be separated into three groups (Stage I, II-III, and IV). CONCLUSIONS: The 8th edition of AJCC/UICC TNM classification is a useful predictor of OS among ESCC patients who were treated with definitive radiotherapy.
  • Serum lactate dehydrogenase predicts survival in small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases that were treated with whole-brain radiotherapy., Shimpei Anami, Hiroshi Doi, Kiyoshi Nakamatsu, Takuya Uehara, Yutaro Wada, Kohei Fukuda, Masahiro Inada, Kazuki Ishikawa, Shuichi Kanamori, Yasumasa Nishimura, Journal of radiation research, Journal of radiation research, 60(2), 257 - 263, Mar. 01 2019 , Refereed
    Summary:This study aimed to identify factors that predict prognosis after radiotherapy for brain metastases (BMs) from small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). This study retrospectively evaluated 48 consecutive patients who underwent whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for BMs from SCLC between February 2008 and December 2017. WBRT was delivered at a median dose of 30 Gy (range: 30-40 Gy) in 10 fractions (range: 10-16 fractions). Clinical factors were tested for associations with overall survival after WBRT. The median survival and 1-year overall survival rate after WBRT treatment were 232 days and 34.4%, respectively. Univariate analyses revealed that longer survival was associated with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1, asymptomatic BMs, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the normal range, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recursive partitioning analysis class 2, and a graded prognostic assessment score of ≥1.5 (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). In the multivariate analyses, longer survival was independently associated with asymptomatic BMs [hazard ratio for death (HR), 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.12-0.79; P < 0.05] and LDH in the normal range (HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21-0.83; P < 0.05). The presence of symptoms due to BMs and LDH values independently predicted prognosis after WBRT for BMs from SCLC. Elevated LDH may provide valuable information for identifying patients with BMs who could have poor survival outcomes.
  • Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Survival After Whole-brain Radiotherapy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, Doi, Hiroshi, Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi, Anami, Shimpei, Fukuda, Kohei, Inada, Masahiro, Tatebe, Hitoshi, Ishikawa, Kazuki, Kanamori, Shuichi, Monzen, Hajime, Nishimura, Yasumasa, IN VIVO, IN VIVO, 33(1), 195 - 201, Jan. 2019 , Refereed
    Summary:Aim: This study aimed to identify prognostic factors for response to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases (BMs) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: This study retrospectively evaluated 100 patients who underwent WBRT for BMs from NSCLC between December 2012 and October 2017. Clinical factors were tested for associations with overall survival after WBRT. Results: The median follow-up time was 134 days (range=14-1,395 days), the median survival time was 143 days, and the 1-year survival rate was 30.4%. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that better survival was independently associated with expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), no previous treatment for BMs, no extracranial disease, and a neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) of <5.0. Conclusion: A low NLR and positive PD-L1 expression independently predict better prognosis in patients with BMs from NSCLC after WBRT. These findings suggest that the potential immune response may influence survival among patients with BMs.
  • Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumors: Current status and perspectives, Hiroshi Doi, Naohito Beppu, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Kozo Kuribayashi, Anticancer Research, Anticancer Research, 38(2), 591 - 599, Feb. 01 2018 , Refereed
    Summary:Surgical resection is the standard therapy for solitary primary or metastatic liver tumors. However, liver tumors are often unresectable at diagnosis and hepatectomy is invasive. Local therapies, such as radiofrequency ablation, are used instead, which can be challenging. Recent advances in modern radiotherapy, including stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have increased the use of radiotherapy as a curative modality. SBRT delivers ablative high doses of irradiation in small volumes. SBRT for liver tumors provided local control with potential survival benefits in patients with inoperable status. However, the following issues remain: primary vs. metastatic liver cancers SBRT-related toxicity and prevention pathological features of liver cancers and potential SBRT strategies. We summarized a literature review to summarize the effectiveness of SBRT and patient tolerance and present the current status and future perspective of SBRT for liver tumors. SBRT is a potential game changer for multimodal therapy.
  • Two-step Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Initial Clinical Experience and Validation of Clinical Staging., Hitoshi Tatebe, Hiroshi Doi, Kazuki Ishikawa, Hisato Kawakami, Masaki Yokokawa, Kiyoshi Nakamatsu, Shuichi Kanamori, Toru Shibata, Mutsukazu Kitano, Yasumasa Nishimura, Anticancer research, Anticancer research, 38(2), 979 - 986, Feb. 2018 , Refereed
    Summary:AIM: To evaluate the clinical results of two-step intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty patients were treated with two-step IMRT between 2002 and 2014. Whole-neck radiotherapy (44.0-50.0 Gy/22-25 fractions) was delivered by IMRT, followed by boost IMRT to the high-risk clinical target volume (total dose of 70.0 Gy/35 fractions). Forty-seven patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Immunohistochemistry for human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV/p16) was performed for 64 patients. RESULTS: The 5-year overall survival and locoregional control rates for stage I, II, III, and IVA-B disease were 80.0%, 75.0%, 78.0%, and 64.0% and 100.0%, 75.0%, 92.0%, and 82.0%, respectively. Overall survival was significantly higher in HPV/p16-positive patients than in HPV/p16-negative patients (p=0.01). Xerostomia of grade 2 or more was noted in 10 patients. CONCLUSION: Favourable overall survival and locoregional control rates with excellent salivary preservation were obtained using the two-step IMRT method for oropharyngeal cancer.
  • Clinical Assessment of Micro-residual Tumors during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Kenji Uemoto, Hiroshi Doi, Hiroya Shiomi, Koichi Yamada, Daisaku Tatsumi, Taku Yasumoto, Masaaki Takashina, Masahiko Koizumi, Ryoong-Jin Oh, Anticancer Research, Anticancer Research, 38(2), 945 - 954, Feb. 01 2018 , Refereed
    Summary:Background: This study aimed to assess the need to consider microscopic invasion in terms of treatment planning in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma and elucidate the appropriate clinical target volume (CTV) margin. Patients and Methods: A total of 121 patients (with 146 liver tumors) who underwent SBRT between July 2007 and August 2016 were analyzed, regarding overall survival and local control (LC). Results: The 2- and 5-year LC rates were 91.5% and 89.8%, respectively. Planning target volume (PTV) margin < 8 mm was associated with poor LC. Of the 77 patients with PTV margin of < 8 mm, age < 75 years was associated with poor LC, while alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) ≤20 ng/ml was associated with good LC. Conclusion: In patients with high AFP levels, there is a possibility of microscopic invasion around the tumor, suggesting that LC may be improved by adding an additional clinical target volume margin to the gross tumor volume.
  • Relationship between Eustachian tube dysfunction and otitis media with effusion in radiotherapy patients, Kazuyuki Akazawa, H. Doi, S. Ohta, T. Terada, M. Fujiwara, N. Uwa, M. Tanooka, M. Sakagami, Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 132(2), 111 - 116, Feb. 01 2018 , Refereed
    Summary:Objective: This study evaluated the relationship between radiation and Eustachian tube dysfunction, and examined the radiation dose required to induce otitis media with effusion. Methods: The function of 36 Eustachian tubes in 18 patients with head and neck cancer were examined sonotubometrically before, during, and 1, 2 and 3 months after, intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Patients with an increase of 5 dB or less in sound pressure level (dB) during swallowing were categorised as being in the dysfunction group. Additionally, radiation dose distributions were assessed in all Eustachian tubes using three dose-volume histogram parameters. Results: Twenty-two of 25 normally functioning Eustachian tubes before radiotherapy (88.0 per cent) shifted to the dysfunction group after therapy. All ears that developed otitis media with effusion belonged to the dysfunction group. The radiation dose threshold evaluation revealed that ears with otitis media with effusion received significantly higher doses to the Eustachian tubes. Conclusion: The results indicate a relationship between radiation dose and Eustachian tube dysfunction and otitis media with effusion.
  • Present and future roles of FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of gastrointestinal cancer: an update, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Masatoyo Nakajo, Hayato Kaida, Ryogo Minamimoto, Kenji Hirata, Masakatsu Tsurusaki, Hiroshi Doi, Yoshiko Ueno, Keitaro Sofue, Yukihisa Tamaki, Koichiro Yamakado, NAGOYA JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE, NAGOYA JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE, 79(4), 527 - 543, Nov. 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) integrated with 2-[F-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is a useful tool for acquisition of both glucose metabolism and anatomic imaging data, as only a single device and one diagnostic session is required, thus opening a new field in clinical oncologic imaging. FDG-PET/CT has been successfully used for initial staging, restaging, assessment of early treatment response, evaluation of metastatic disease response, and prognostication of intestinal cancer as well as various malignant tumors. We reviewed the current status and role of FDG-PET/CT for management of patients with esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer, with focus on both its usefulness and limitations.
  • Validation of the liver mean dose in terms of the biological effective dose for the prevention of radiation-induced liver damage, Hiroshi Doi, Norihisa Masai, Kenji Uemoto, Osamu Suzuki, Hiroya Shiomi, Daisaku Tatsumi, Ryoong-Jin Oh, Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy, 22(4), 303 - 309, Jul. 01 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Aim The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal mean liver biologically effective dose (BED) to prevent radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Background The actual mean doses appropriate for liver irradiation in modern radiotherapy techniques have not been adequately investigated, although SBRT is sometimes alternatively performed using fractionated regimens. Materials and methods SBRT treatment plans for liver tumors in 50 patients were analyzed. All distributions of the physical doses were transformed to BED2 using the linear-quadratic model. The relationship between physical doses and the BED2 for the liver were then analyzed, as was the relationship between the mean BED2 for the liver and the planning target volume (PTV). Results A significantly positive correlation was observed between the mean physical dose for the background liver and the mean BED2 for the whole liver (P <  0.0001, r = 0.9558). Using the LQ model, a mean BED2 of 73 and 16 Gy for the whole liver corresponded to the hepatic tolerable mean physical dose of 21 and 6 Gy for Child–Pugh A- and B-classified patients, respectively. Additionally, the PTV values were positively correlated with the BEDs for the whole liver (P <  0.0001, r = 0.8600), and the background liver (P <  0.0001, r = 0.7854). Conclusion A mean BED2 of 73 and 16 Gy for the whole liver appeared appropriate to prevent RILD in patients with Child–Pugh classes A and B, respectively. The mean BED2 for the liver correlated well with the PTV.
  • Utility of intraoral stents in external beam radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, Hiroshi Doi, Masao Tanooka, Toshihisa Ishida, Kuniyasu Moridera, Kenji Ichimiya, Kazuo Tarutani, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Masayuki Fujiwara, Hiromitsu Kishimoto, Norihiko Kamikonya, Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy, 22(4), 310 - 318, Jul. 01 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Aim This study aimed to assess the utility and stability of intraoral stent during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Background The benefits of intraoral stents in radiotherapy are unclear. Materials and methods We analyzed 386 setup errors in 12 patients who received IMRT for head and neck cancers without intraoral stents (intraoral stent [−]) and 183 setup errors in 6 patients who received IMRT with intraoral stents (intraoral stent [+]). All patients were matched according to the immobilization method (masks and boards). Setup errors were measured as the distance from the initial setup based on the marking on the skin and mask to the corrected position based on bone matching on cone beam computed tomography. Results The mean interfractional setup errors in the right–left, craniocaudal, anterior–posterior (AP), and three-dimensional (3D) directions were −0.33, 0.08, −0.25, and 2.75 mm in the intraoral stent (−) group and −0.37, 0.24, −0.63, and 2.42 mm in the intraoral stent (+) group, respectively (P = 0.50, 0.65, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively). The systematic errors for the same directions were 0.89, 1.46, 1.15, and 0.88 mm in the intraoral stent (−) group and 0.62, 1.69, 0.68, and 0.56 mm in the intraoral stents (+) group, respectively. The random errors were 1.43, 1.43, 1.44, and 1.22 mm in the intraoral stent (−) group and 1.06, 1.11, 1.05, and 0.92 mm in the intraoral stents (+) group, respectively. Conclusion Setup errors can be significantly reduced in the AP and 3D-directions by using intraoral stents.
  • Effect of primary tumor location and tumor size on the response to radiotherapy for liver metastases from colorectal cancer, Hiroshi Doi, Kenji Uemoto, Osamu Suzuki, Koichi Yamada, Norihisa Masai, Daisaku Tatsumi, Hiroya Shiomi, Ryoong-Jin Oh, ONCOLOGY LETTERS, ONCOLOGY LETTERS, 14(1), 453 - 460, Jul. 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Metastatic liver tumors (MLTs) from colorectal cancer (CRC) are often treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The present study aimed to examine the predictive factors for response of MLTs to SBRT. A total of 39 MLTs from 24 patients with CRC were retrospectively analyzed. Radiotherapy for MLT was typically performed with a prescribed dose equivalent to a biologically effective dose (BED) of 100 Gy. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range, 5-64 months). The median prescribed dose and total BED were 56 Gy (range, 45-72 Gy) and 97.5 Gy (range, 71.7-115.5 Gy), respectively, in a median of 8 fractions (range, 4-33 fractions). The 1- and 2-year local control rates were 67.2 and 35.9%, respectively. For patients with MLT treated with ablative SBRT (BED10 >= 100 Gy in <= 5 fractions), the 1- and 2-year local control rates were 83.3 and 62.5%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that primary tumor location (left-sided colon), maximum tumor diameter (<= 30 mm) and ;ablative SBRT (BED10 >= 100 Gy in <= 5 fractions) were significantly associated with improved local control (P=0.0058, P=0.0059 and P=0.0268, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that tumor diameter was significantly associated with improved local control (P=0.0314). In addition, patients who received ablative SBRT had significantly prolonged overall survival times compared with those treated with non-ablative SBRT (P=0.0261). To conclude, tumors mm that can be treated with ablative SBRT are associated with good local control rates: The primary tumor location may affect the radiosensitivity of MLTs.
  • Pravastatin reduces radiation-induced damage in normal tissues, Hiroshi Doi, Seiji Matsumoto, Soichi Odawara, Toshiyuki Shikata, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Masao Tanooka, Yasuhiro Takada, Tohru Tsujimura, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, EXPERIMENTAL AND THERAPEUTIC MEDICINE, EXPERIMENTAL AND THERAPEUTIC MEDICINE, 13(5), 1765 - 1772, May 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Pravastatin is an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase that has been reported to have therapeutic applications in a range of inflammatory conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of pravastatin in an experimental animal model. Mice were divided into two groups: The control group received ionizing radiation with no prior medication, while the pravastatin group received pravastatin prior to ionizing radiation. Pravastatin was administered orally at 30 mg/kg body weight in drinking water at 24 and 4 h before irradiation. Intestinal crypt epithelial cell survival and the incidence of apoptosis in the intestine and lung were measured post-irradiation. The effect of pravastatin on intestinal DNA damage was determined by immunohistochemistry. Finally, the effect of pravastatin on tumor response to radiotherapy was examined in a mouse mesothelioma xenograft model. Pravastatin increased the number of viable intestinal crypts and this effect was statistically significant in the ileum (P<0.0001). The pravastatin group showed significantly lower apoptotic indices in all examined parts of the intestine (P<0.0001) and tended to show reduced apoptosis in the lung. Pravastatin reduced the intestinal expression of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and gamma-H2AX after irradiation. No apparent pravastatin-related differences were observed in the response of xenograft tumors to irradiation. In conclusion, pravastatin had radioprotective effects on the intestine and lung and reduced radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Pravastatin may increase the therapeutic index of radiotherapy.
  • The impact of the radiation-induced regression of positive nodes on survival in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy, Naohito Beppu, Ayako Kakuno, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Nagahide Matsubara, Naohiro Tomita, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, SURGERY, SURGERY, 161(2), 422 - 432, Feb. 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Background. Although preoperative chemoradiotherapy exerts a destructive effect on positive lymph nodes, microscopic examination reveals different degrees of tumor regression. The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of the radiation-induced regression of positive nodes on survival in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods. From 2001 to 2015, 229 patients with T3 rectal cancer underwent total mesorectal excision after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The patients were classified into 3 groups according to their lymph node status: residual cancer cells in positive nodes (Group A), total regression of positive nodes after preoperative chemoradiotherapy with complete fibrosis (Group B), and the entire lymph node filled with lymph nodules and the absence of fibrosis (Group C). The survival of the 3 groups was compared, and a Cox model was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the regression of the positive nodes by preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Results. Groups A, B, and C included 57, 18, and 154 patients, respectively. Group B showed significantly better overall survival than Group A (P = .041) and similar outcomes to Group C (P = .383). Among the patients with positive lymph nodes prior to treatment (Groups A and B), the total regression of the positive nodes after preoperative chemoradiotherapy was the only independent factor to be associated with good overall survival (hazard ratio; 6.26, 95 % confidence interval; 1.28-113.0, P = .020). Conclusion. Total regression of positive nodes by preoperative chemoradiotherapy improves the prognosis of patients with rectal cancer with positive lymph nodes prior to treatment.
  • First-line chemotherapy with pemetrexed plus cisplatin for malignant peritoneal mesothelioma, Eriko Fujimoto, Takashi Kijima, Kozo Kuribayashi, Yoshiki Negi, Shingo Kanemura, Koji Mikami, Hiroshi Doi, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Takashi Nakano, EXPERT REVIEW OF ANTICANCER THERAPY, EXPERT REVIEW OF ANTICANCER THERAPY, 17(9), 865 - 872, 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Background: Mesothelioma of peritoneal origin has wider variation in treatment outcomes than mesothelioma of pleural origin, likely because peritoneal mesothelioma comprises borderline malignant variants and aggressive malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPeM). This study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of first-line systemic pemetrexed and cisplatin chemotherapy in MPeM.Research design and methods: Twenty-four patients with histologically proven MPeM were treated with pemetrexed plus cisplatin as a first-line systemic chemotherapy. The response was evaluated radiologically according to standard Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Twenty-two patients underwent F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/(FDG-PET)/computed tomography(CT) at baseline, and 13 were eligible for metabolic assessment.Results: Two complete responses and 9 partial responses were achieved. Overall response rate and disease control rate were 45.8% and 91.7%, respectively. Median progression-free survival and median overall survival were 11.0months and 15.8months, respectively. Wet- type MPeM had significantly longer survival (40.9months median) than other clinical types (15.5months) (P=0.045). The baseline maximum standardized uptake value in 22 patients was 8.93 (range, 2.5-16.77).Conclusions: Systemic pemetrexed plus cisplatin is active for MPeM. Disparity with the outcome of cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) needs to receive more emphasis, since peritoneal mesothelioma has a 5-year survival rate of 50%.
  • Prognostic value of pretreatment volume-based quantitative 18F-FDG PET/CT parameters in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Hiroshi Doi, Kozo Kuribayashi, Masaki Hashimoto, Tatsuya Tsuchitani, Masao Tanooka, Kazuhito Fukushima, Takashi Nakano, Seiki Hasegawa, Shozo Hirota, European Journal of Radiology, European Journal of Radiology, 86, 176 - 183, Jan. 01 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Purpose To investigate the relationships between pretreatment volume-based quantitative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) parameters and overall survival (OS) in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Materials and methods We retrospectively reviewed data from 201 MPM patients, of whom 38 underwent surgical resection, and calculated the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), including primary tumors and nodal or distant metastatic lesions, on pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT. Relationships between clinicopathological factors (age, sex, performance status, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] score, histological subtype, TNM stage, and treatment strategy), volume-based quantitative PET/CT parameters, and OS were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test. Results The median follow-up was 15 months (range, 1–96 months median, 17 months). In a univariate analysis of all patients, older age (p <  0.05), high EORTC score (p <  0.001), non-epithelioid histological subtype (p <  0.001), high T stage (p <  0.001), positive N/M status (p <  0.05, p <  0.001), advanced TNM stage (p <  0.001), non-surgical treatment (p <  0.001), and high SUVmax (p <  0.001), MTV (p <  0.001), or TLG (p <  0.001) were associated with significantly shorter OS. A multivariate analysis confirmed non-epithelioid subtype (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14–2.48 p <  0.05), non-surgical treatment (HR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.34–0.95 p <  0.05), and high TLG (HR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.14–3.44 p <  0.05) as independent negative predictors. Conclusions Pretreatment volume-based quantitative 18F-FDG PET/CT parameters, especially TLG, could serve as potential surrogate markers for MPM prognosis.
  • Metabolic response assessment with 18F-FDG-PET/CT is superior to modified RECIST for the evaluation of response to platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma, Shingo Kanemura, Kozo Kuribayashi, Norihiko Funaguchi, Eisuke Shibata, Koji Mikami, Hiroshi Doi, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Seiki Hasegawa, Takashi Nakano, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 86, 92 - 98, Jan. 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Purpose: Efficient monitoring of tumor responsiveness to chemotherapy is essential to mitigate high mortality risks and cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics. However, there is no consensus on the most suitable diagnostic technique/parameters for assessing response to chemotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). We compared the tumor responsiveness of MPM patients as assessed using modified RECIST (mRECIST) criteria and integrated 18F-FDG-PET/CT. Methods: Histologically confirmed MPM patients (N=82) who were treated with three cycles of cisplatin and pemetrexed, or carboplatin and pemetrexed, were included. mRECIST and integrated 18F-FDGPET/CT were used to evaluate MPM tumor response to chemotherapy. Metabolic non-responders were defined as those with a 25% or greater increase in SUVmax compared with the previous value. Time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were compared between metabolic-responders and non responders. Results: After three cycles of chemotherapy, 62(75.6%) of the patients were classified as having SD, 15 (18%) with partial remission (PR), and 5 (6%) with progressive disease (PD), based on mRECIST criteria. The cumulative median OS was 728.0 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 545.9-910.1) and cumulative median TTP was 365.0 days (95% CI: 296.9-433.1). For the 82 patients, the disease control rate was 93.9%, whereas the metabolic response rate was only 71.9% (p < 0.001). All PD and PR patients were found to be metabolic responders on 18F-FDG-PET/CT; however, among the 62mRECIST SD patients, 18 (29%) were classified as metabolic non-responders. The median TTP for metabolic responders was 13.7 months, while it was 10.0 months for non-responders(p < 0.001). Metabolic responders had a trend toward longer OS, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (metabolic responders:33.9 months; non-responders: 21.6 months; p > 0.05). Conclusion: Several mRECIST-confirmed SD MPM patients may be classified as metabolic non-responders onl 8F-FDGPET/CT. Metabolic response is significantly correlated with the median TTP, suggesting it should be included in the evaluation of the response to chemotherapy in MPM patients classified as mRECIST SD, to identify non-responders. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • First-line chemotherapy with pemetrexed plus cisplatin for malignant peritoneal mesothelioma, Eriko Fujimoto, Takashi Kijima, Kozo Kuribayashi, Yoshiki Negi, Shingo Kanemura, Koji Mikami, Hiroshi Doi, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Takashi Nakano, EXPERT REVIEW OF ANTICANCER THERAPY, EXPERT REVIEW OF ANTICANCER THERAPY, 17(9), 865 - 872, 2017 , Refereed
    Summary:Background: Mesothelioma of peritoneal origin has wider variation in treatment outcomes than mesothelioma of pleural origin, likely because peritoneal mesothelioma comprises borderline malignant variants and aggressive malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPeM). This study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of first-line systemic pemetrexed and cisplatin chemotherapy in MPeM.Research design and methods: Twenty-four patients with histologically proven MPeM were treated with pemetrexed plus cisplatin as a first-line systemic chemotherapy. The response was evaluated radiologically according to standard Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Twenty-two patients underwent F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/(FDG-PET)/computed tomography(CT) at baseline, and 13 were eligible for metabolic assessment.Results: Two complete responses and 9 partial responses were achieved. Overall response rate and disease control rate were 45.8% and 91.7%, respectively. Median progression-free survival and median overall survival were 11.0months and 15.8months, respectively. Wet- type MPeM had significantly longer survival (40.9months median) than other clinical types (15.5months) (P=0.045). The baseline maximum standardized uptake value in 22 patients was 8.93 (range, 2.5-16.77).Conclusions: Systemic pemetrexed plus cisplatin is active for MPeM. Disparity with the outcome of cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) needs to receive more emphasis, since peritoneal mesothelioma has a 5-year survival rate of 50%.
  • Radiotherapy in late elderly (aged 75 or older) patients with paranasal sinus carcinoma: a single institution experience, Hiroshi Doi, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Masao Tanooka, Tomonori Terada, Kazuma Noguchi, Yasuhiro Takada, Masayuki Fujiwara, Reiichi Ishikura, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY, EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY, 273(12), 4485 - 4492, Dec. 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility of radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced paranasal sinus carcinomas in late elderly patients (aged aeyen75 years) from a single institution in Japan. From 2000 to 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 14 patients (11 maxillary and 3 ethmoid sinus carcinoma patients) who underwent RT for pathologically confirmed paranasal sinus carcinomas. RT was performed without unexpected cessations. Two patients, however, developed Grade 3 mucositis. The median follow-up duration was 13 months (range 2-54 months). The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 81.8 and 54.5 %, respectively. The local response rate after the initial treatment was 85.7 %. The 1- and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 46.2 and 24.8 %, respectively. Univariate analysis of different clinicopathological parameters was conducted to identify associations with OS and PFS. We demonstrated that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of > 60 Gy with concomitant intra-arterial (cisplatin-based) infusion chemoradiotherapy led to improved OS and PFS rates, although no statistical significance was observed. Moreover, none of the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients who received 33 fractions of 66 Gy in IMRT died during the median follow-up period of 13 months (range 12-25 months). In conclusion, RT with concomitant intra-arterial (cisplatin-based) infusion chemoradiotherapy can be considered an effective, well-tolerated, and feasible treatment option for late elderly patients with paranasal sinus carcinomas. In addition, > 60 Gy of RT in IMRT led to improved survival outcomes in elderly paranasal sinus carcinoma patients.
  • Present and future roles of FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of malignant pleural mesothelioma, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Hiroshi Doi, Kozo Kuribayashi, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 34(8), 537 - 547, Aug. 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) integrated with 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (F-18-FDG) has emerged as a powerful tool for combined metabolic and anatomic evaluations in clinical oncologic imaging. This review discusses the utility of F-18-FDG PET/CT as a tool to manage patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. We discuss different stages of patient management in malignant pleural mesothelioma, including diagnosis, initial staging, therapy planning, early treatment response assessment, re-staging, and prognosis.
  • Clinicopathological outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy using S-1 plus Irinotecan for T4 lower rectal cancer, Naohito Beppu, Hidenori Yoshie, Fumihiko Kimura, Tsukasa Aihara, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Nagahide Matsubara, Naohiro Tomita, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, SURGERY TODAY, SURGERY TODAY, 46(7), 852 - 859, Jul. 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:Purpose To investigate the clinicopathological outcomes of patients with T4 lower rectal cancer treated using preoperative chemoradiotherapy with S-1 plus Irinotecan. Methods Between 2005 and 2011, 35 patients with T4M0 lower rectal cancer, diagnosed initially as T4a in 12 and as T4b in 23, were treated with 45 Gy of radiotherapy concomitantly with S-1 plus Irinotecan. The median follow-up period was 50.6 months (range 2-123 months). Results A total of 32 patients (91.4 %) completed the radiotherapy and 26 (74.3 %) completed the full chemotherapy regimen. Radical surgery was then performed in 33 (94.3 %) of the 35 patients after the exclusion of two patients, who had macroscopic residual disease. The pathological diagnosis was downstaged from T4a to ypT0-3 in all 12 of those patients (100 %) and from T4b to ypT0-4a in 20 of those 23 patients (87.0 %). The tumor regression grade of 1a/1b/2/3 (complete response) was 10/8/15/2, respectively. In terms of long-term survival, the 5-year local relapse-free survival rate was 74.8 % and the recurrence-free survival rate was 52.0 %. Conclusions This regimen may result in favorable down-staging. Moreover, in this series, pathological evidence of involvement of adjacent organs was rare following preoperative chemoradiotherapy, in the patients with disease diagnosed as T4b at the initial staging.
  • Threshold doses and prediction of visually apparent liver dysfunction after stereotactic body radiation therapy in cirrhotic and normal livers using magnetic resonance imaging, Hiroshi Doi, Hiroya Shiomi, Norihisa Masai, Daisaku Tatsumi, Takumi Igura, Yasuharu Imai, Ryoong-Jin Oh, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, 57(3), 294 - 300, Jun. 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:The purpose of the present study was to investigate the threshold dose for focal liver damage after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in cirrhotic and normal livers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 64 patients who underwent SBRT for liver tumors, including 54 cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 10 non-cirrhotic patients with liver metastases, were analyzed. MRI was performed 3-6 months after SBRT, using gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted sequences. All MRI datasets were merged with 3D dosimetry data. All dose distributions were corrected to the biologically effective dose using the linear-quadratic model with an assumed alpha/beta ratio of 2 Gy. The development of liver dysfunction was validly correlated with isodose distribution. The median biologically effective dose (BED2) that provoked liver dysfunction was 57.3 (30.0-227.9) and 114.0 (70.4-244.9) Gy in cirrhotic and normal livers, respectively (P = 0.0002). The BED2 associated with a >5% risk of liver dysfunction was 38.5 in cirrhotic livers and 70.4 Gy in normal livers. The threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction was not significantly different between Child-Pugh A and B patients (P = 0.0719). Moreover, the fractionation schedule was not significantly correlated with threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction in the cirrhotic liver (P = 0.1019). In the cirrhotic liver, fractionation regimen and Child -Pugh classification did not significantly influence the threshold BED2 for focal liver damage after SBRT. We suggest that the threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction after SBRT is 40 and 70 Gy in the cirrhotic and normal liver, respectively.
  • Present and future roles of FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of lung cancer, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Hiroshi Doi, Tomonori Kanda, Tomohiko Yamane, Tetsuya Tsujikawa, Hayato Kaida, Yukihisa Tamaki, Kozo Kuribayashi, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 34(6), 387 - 399, Jun. 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (F-18-FDG) has emerged as a powerful tool for combined metabolic and anatomic evaluation in clinical oncologic imaging. This review discusses the utility of F-18-FDG PET/CT as a tool for managing patients with lung cancer. We discuss different patient management stages, including diagnosis, initial staging, therapy planning, early treatment response assessment, re-staging, and prognosis.
  • SUVmax on FDG-PET is a predictor of prognosis in patients with maxillary sinus cancer, Hiroshi Doi, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Kazuhito Fukushima, Yusuke Kawanaka, Miya Mouri, Satoshi Yamamoto, Reiichi Ishikura, Tomonori Terada, Kazuma Noguchi, Shozo Hirota, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 34(5), 349 - 355, May 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:Our aim was to determine whether the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary lesion demonstrated by [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is associated with the prognosis of maxillary sinus cancer. The relationships of clinicopathological factors including age, T stage, N stage, histologic type, treatment strategy, and primary tumor SUVmax with progression-free (PFS) and overall (OS) survival were evaluated using the log-rank test and Cox method in 31 patients with maxillary sinus cancer before combined superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy using high-dose cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy, or radiotherapy alone. The median duration of follow-up was 55.4 (range 9.7-72.6) months. PFS and OS of patients exhibiting a high SUVmax (a parts per thousand yen16 and a parts per thousand yen17, respectively) for the primary tumor were significantly lower than those of patients for whom the primary tumor SUVmax was low (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.033, respectively). Multivariate analyses showed that T stage (p = 0.0049) and primary tumor SUVmax (p = 0.026) were independently prognostic of poorer PFS and that only primary tumor SUVmax (p = 0.049) was independently prognostic of poorer OS. SUVmax of the primary tumor determined by FDG-PET/CT before treatment could be a good surrogate marker for prognostication of maxillary sinus cancer.
  • Correlation of the SUVmax of FDG-PET and ADC values of diffusion-weighted MR imaging with pathologic prognostic factors in breast carcinoma, Kazuhiro Kitajim, Toshiko Yamano, Kazuhito Fukushima, Yasuo Miyoshi, Seiichi Hirota, Yusuke Kawanaka, Mouri Miya, Hiroshi Doi, Koichiro Yamakado, Shozo Hirota, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 85(5), 943 - 949, May 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:Purpose: To correlate both primary lesion maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of FDG-PET/CT, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with clinicopathologic prognostic factors in patients with breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: 214 patients with 216 mass -type invasive breast carcinomas underwent whole body FDG-PET/CT and 3-Tesla breast MRI including DWI before initial therapy. The primary tumor's SUVmax and ADC values were measured using FDG-PET/CT and DWI, respectively. Histologic analysis parameters included tumor size, expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67, nuclear grade, histology subtype, and axillary lymph node (LN) metastasis. The relationships among SUVmax, ADC values, and pathologic prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: The mean SUVmax and ADCmean were 5.63 +/- 3.79 (range, 1.2-24.17) and 894 +/- 204 x 10-6 mm(2/)s (range, 452-1550 x 10(-6)), respectively. There was a significant but weak inverse correlation between the SUVmax and ADCmean values (correlation coefficient r = 0.30, p < 0.0001). SUVmax was associated with numerous prognostic factors such as tumor size (p < 0.0001), expression levels of ER (p = 0.00041), PR (p = 0.00028), HER2 (p = 0.00021), and Ki-67 (p < 0.0001), nuclear grade (p < 0.0001), histology subtype (p = 0.00061), axillary LN metastasis (p < 0.0001), and TNM staging (p < 0.0001). Meanwhile, ADCmean value was associated with tumor size (p = 0.013), expression of Ki-67 (p = 0.0010), histology subtype (p = 0.00013), axillary LN metastasis (p = 0.00059), and TNM staging (p = 0.0011). Conclusions: Primary tumor SUVmax on FDG-PET/CT has a stronger relationship with known prognostic parameters and may be a more useful for predicting the prognosis of breast carcinoma than ADC values. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Added value of pretreatment F-18-FDG PET/CT for staging of advanced gastric cancer: Comparison with contrast-enhanced MDCT, Yusuke Kawanaka, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Kazuhito Fukushima, Miya Mouri, Hiroshi Doi, Tsutomu Oshima, Hirotaka Niwa, Nobuaki Kaibe, Mitsuru Sasako, Toshihiko Tomita, Hiroto Miwa, Shozo Hirota, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 85(5), 989 - 995, May 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:Purpose: To evaluate the added clinical value of pretreatment F-18-FDG PET/CT compared with conventional contrast-enhanced multidetector-row CT (CECT) alone for staging of advanced gastric cancer Materials and methods: We studied 106 patients with locally advanced gastric cancer who underwent pretreatment CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT. Two experienced reviewers assessed the diagnostic performance of both CECT alone and the combination of CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the primary tumor, regional lymph node metastasis (N) and distant metastasis (M), rating their diagnostic confidence with a 5 -point scoring system for each location. The two methods were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for histopathologic findings, imaging, and clinical follow-up as the reference standards. Results: Among the 106 patients, 96 primary tumors (90.6%) were detected by CECT, while 101 (95.3%) were clearly identified by F-18-FDG PET/CT (p = 0.074). Patient -based areas under the ROC curves for CECT alone versus the combination of CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT for diagnosis of N stage, peritoneal dissemination, liver metastasis, distant lymph node metastasis, bone metastasis, metastasis at other sites and overall M stage were 0.787 vs. 0.858 (p = 0.13), 0.866 vs. 0.878 (p = 0.31), 0.998 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.36), 0.744 vs. 0.865 (p = 0.049), 0.786 vs. 0.998 (p = 0.034), 0.944 vs. 0.984 (p = 0.34), and 0.889 vs. 0.912 (p = 0.21), respectively. The diagnostic performance of primary tumor detection and NM staging was not influenced by the histologic subtype. Conclusion: Adding 18F-FDG PET/CT to CECT provides better diagnostic accuracy for detection of distant lymph node metastasis and bone metastasis in patients with untreated advanced gastric cancer. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Diagnostic and prognostic value of F-18-FDG PET/CT for axillary lymph node staging in patients with breast cancer, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Kazuhito Fukushima, Yasuo Miyoshi, Takayuki Katsuura, Yoko Igarashi, Yusuke Kawanaka, Miya Mouri, Kaoru Maruyama, Toshiko Yamano, Hiroshi Doi, Koichiro Yamakado, Seiichi Hirota, Shozo Hirota, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 34(3), 220 - 228, Mar. 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of F-18-FDG-PET/CT for axillary lymph node (LN) staging in breast cancer patients, employing histologic evaluation as the reference. Among 196 patients with biopsy-proven breast cancer who had undergone F-18-FDG-PET/CT before mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery with sentinel LN biopsy and/or axillary LN dissection, 200 axillae were retrospectively analyzed by visual assessment and quantitatively using SUVmax. LN SUVmax as well as other clinicopathological features were assessed for their prognostic value using the log-rank test and Cox method. Metastasis was diagnosed histopathologically in 56 (28 %) axillae. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of visual PET/CT for diagnosing node metastasis were 55.4, 95.8, and 84.5 %, respectively. When the optimal discriminative SUVmax cutoff was 1.5, these figures were 51.8, 97.2, and 84.5 %, respectively. Fourteen of 55 patients (25.5 %) with LN metastases suffered a recurrence during follow-up (median 39 months). Patients with a high nodal SUVmax (a parts per thousand yen1.7) had a significantly lower progression-free survival rate than those with a low SUVmax (p = 0.0499). Axillary nodal and primary tumor SUVmax as well as estrogen receptor status were significantly associated with recurrence. Axillary nodal SUVmax may be a prognostic indicator of disease recurrence in patients with axillary LN metastases.
  • Functional Outcomes of Patients Treated with Intensive Medications for Bowel and Pain Control for Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Who Received Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy, Naohito Beppu, Kimura Fumihiko, Doi Hiroshi, Kamikonya Norihiko, Nagahide Matsubara, Naohiro Tomita, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, DIGESTIVE SURGERY, DIGESTIVE SURGERY, 33(5), 431 - 438, 2016 , Refereed
    Summary:Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the functional outcomes of patients treated with intensive medications for bowel and pain control for low-lying rectal cancer who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: The inclusion criterion was sphincter-preserving surgery following CRT for T3 middle and low rectal cancer. Postoperative defecation control was conducted using calcium polycarbophil and loperamide, and anal pain control was conducted using oxycodone hydrochloride hydrate. The functional outcomes were determined by an annual questionnaire after stoma closure. Results: Of 64 patients evaluated, 33 were reconstructed using the double stapling technique (DST) and 31 were reconstructed using the intersphincteric resection (ISR) technique. The median Visual Analogue Scale at ISR was improved from 7 to 1.5 at 1 year after surgery. The median Wexner scores were 6.0, 6.0, 5.0 and 5.0 for DST and 14.5, 12.0, 10.0 and 8.0 for ISR for the first 4 years, respectively. The only independent predictor of a poor bowel function (Wexner score > 10) according to a multivariate analyses was pelvic infection (OR 3.994, 95% CI 1.235-13.52, p = 0.021), while ISR was not a predictor. Conclusions: Anal pain following ISR can be controlled with oxycodone hydrochloride hydrate therapy. ISR is feasible following CRT for low-lying rectal cancer. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel
  • Comparison of the pathological response of the mesorectal positive nodes between short-course chemoradiotherapy with delayed surgery and long-course chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer, Naohito Beppu, Masayoshi Kobayashi, Nagahide Matsubara, Masashi Noda, Tomoki Yamano, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Ayako Kakuno, Fumihiko Kimura, Naoki Yamanaka, Hidenori Yanagi, Naohiro Tomita, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COLORECTAL DISEASE, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COLORECTAL DISEASE, 30(10), 1339 - 1347, Oct. 2015 , Refereed
    Summary:The aim of this study was to compare the pathological response of mesorectal positive nodes between short-course chemoradiotherapy with delayed surgery (SCRT-delay) and long-course chemoradiotherapy (LC-CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. The resected primary tumor specimens following the two different approaches were assessed utilizing the tumor regression grade (TRG 0-4), and each positive lymph node was assessed according to the lymph node regression grade (LRG 1-3), with TRG 4 and LRG 3 indicating total regression. The lymph node sizes were measured to elucidate any correlation with LRG scores. Seventy-four patients with ypN-positive rectal cancer had 220 positive lymph nodes following the SCRT-delay, and 48 patients had 141 positive lymph nodes following the LC-CRT. The distribution of LRG 1/2/3 in the two groups was 123/72/25 and 60/31/50 (p < 0.001), respectively, and the distribution of TRG 0/1/2/3/4 in the two groups was 36/19/19/0 and 12/15/20/1 (p = 0.005), respectively. The requirements of total regression of positive lymph nodes were a primary tumor degenerated to TRG 3 with a size less than 6 mm in SCRT-delay (sensitivity, 60.9 %) or a primary tumor degenerated to TRG 2-4 with a size less than 5 mm at TRG 2 (sensitivity, 57.6 %) or 6 mm at TRG 3 and 4 (sensitivity, 84.2 %) in LC-CRT as indicated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The tumor regression effect of LC-CRT on the primary tumor and positive nodes was more favorable than SCRT-delay, and LC-CRT is able to predict the LRG 3 response with a high sensitivity.
  • Short-course radiotherapy with delayed surgery versus conventional chemoradiotherapy: A comparison of the short- and long-term outcomes in patients with T3 rectal cancer, Naohito Beppu, Nagahide Matsubara, Masashi Noda, Tomoki Yamano, Ayako Kakuno, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Fumihiko Kimura, Naoki Yamanaka, Hidenori Yanagi, Naohiro Tomita, SURGERY, SURGERY, 158(1), 225 - 235, Jul. 2015 , Refereed
    Summary:Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare the short- and long-term outcomes between short-course radiotherapy with delayed surgery (SRT-delay) and a standard conventional chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimen. Methods. Two collaborating institutions adopted different regimens; the SRT-delay regimen was selected by Meiwa Hospital and the CRT regimen was selected by Hyogo College of Medicine. The inclusion criteria were T3 middle and low rectal cancer patients treated with radical surgery after preoperative therapy. The median follow-up period was 44 months (range, 12-85). Results. From 2007 to 2013, 104 patients were treated using the SRT-delay regimen and 61 patients were treated using the CRT regimen. The pretreatment characteristics of the 2 groups were not significantly different. The sphincter-preserving rate (93.3%, 85.2%), T downstaging (37.5%, 37.7%), ypN(-) (74.0%, 67.2%), postoperative complications and the bowel, and urinary and sexual functioning of the SRT-delay regimen were noninferior to those of the CRT regimen. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival in the SRT-delay and CRT groups were 90.6% and 90.6% (P = .764), 83.8% and 78.3% (P = .687) and 96.0% and 92.8% (P = .833), respectively. Conclusion. The SRT-delay regimen was noninferior in terms of the downstaging effect, and oncologic and functional outcomes compared with the CRT regimen for T3 middle and low rectal cancer.
  • The threshold of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: a retrospective analysis of 116 cases, Masayuki Fujiwara, Norihiko Kamikonya, Soichi Odawara, Hitomi Suzuki, Yasue Niwa, Yasuhiro Takada, Hiroshi Doi, Tomonori Terada, Nobuhiro Uwa, Kosuke Sagawa, Shozo Hirota, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, 56(3), 577 - 582, May 2015 , Refereed
    Summary:The purpose of the present study was to determine the risk factors for developing thyroid disorders based on a dose-volume histograms (DVHs) analysis. Data from a total of 116 consecutive patients undergoing 3D conformal radiation therapy for head and neck cancers was retrospectively evaluated. Radiation therapy was performed between April 2007 and December 2010. There were 108 males and 8 females included in the study. The median follow-up term was 24 months (range, 1-62 months). The thyroid function was evaluated by measuring thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) levels. The mean thyroid dose, and the volume of thyroid gland spared from doses >= 10, 20, 30 and 40 Gy (VS10, VS20, VS30 and VS40) were calculated for all patients. The thyroid dose and volume were calculated by the radiotherapy planning system (RTPS). The cumulative incidences of hypothyroidism were 21.1% and 36.4% at one year and two years, respectively, after the end of radiation therapy. In the DVH analyses, the patients who received a mean thyroid dose <30 Gy had a significantly lower incidence of hypothyroidism. The univariate analyses showed that the VS10, VS20, VS30 and VS40 were associated with the risk of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism was a relatively common type of late radiation-induced toxicity. A mean thyroid dose of 30 Gy may be a useful threshold for predicting the development of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancers.
  • Feasibility of Modified Short-Course Radiotherapy Combined With a Chemoradiosensitizer for T3 Rectal Cancer, Naohito Beppu, Nagahide Matsubara, Ayako Kakuno, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Naoki Yamanaka, Hidenori Yanagi, Naohiro Tomita, DISEASES OF THE COLON & RECTUM, DISEASES OF THE COLON & RECTUM, 58(5), 479 - 487, May 2015 , Refereed
    Summary:BACKGROUND: 5-Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is considered to be a radiosensitizer; however, conventional short-course radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy is generally thought to not be feasible because of the prevalence of side effects. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of modified short-course radiotherapy combined with a chemoradiosensitizer for T3 rectal cancer. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: This study was retrospective in nature and used a prospectively collected database. PATIENTS: Patients with T3 rectal cancer located below the peritoneum reflection were selected. INTERVENTIONS: A total dose of 25 Gy of radiotherapy was administered in 10 fractions of 2.5 Gy each for 5 days. Radiotherapy was performed with S-1 as a radiosensitizer from day 1 to day 10. Surgery was targeted to be performed 4 weeks after radiotherapy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: The morbidity, sphincter-preserving rate, anal function, and long-term outcomes were assessed. RESULTS: All patients (n = 170) completed the radiotherapy regimen and 166 (97.6%) completed the combination regimen with chemotherapy. A total of 149 patients (87.6%) had sphincter-preserving surgery (double stapling technique (DST), 58 patients; intersphincteric resection (ISR), 91 patients), and postoperative complications were relatively mild (anastomotic leakage, 15.4%; intra-abdominal infection, 8.2%). Among those undergoing sphincter preserving surgery, the 5-year local relapse-free survival rate was 94.3% in the DST group, and 89.8% in the ISR group. With respect to the anal function, the Wexner score the first year after stoma closure for the double-stapling technique group was 6 and that for intersphincteric resection was 15; however, the score for the intersphincteric resection group was improved to 8 at 4 years after stoma closure. LIMITATIONS: This study had limitations because it was an uncontrolled, 1-arm, retrospective review with a small sample size. CONCLUSIONS: Modified short-course radiotherapy combined with chemoradiosensitizer is a feasible approach for treating T3 rectal cancer. With the use of the short-course approach, efforts to reduce the incidence of side effects by appropriately prolonging the waiting period enable the administration of combination treatment with short-course radiotherapy and chemotherapy.
  • Pathologic evaluation of the response of mesorectal positive nodes to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer, Naohito Beppu, Nagabide Matsubara, Masashi Noda, Tomoki Yamano, Ayako Kakuno, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Naoki Yamanaka, Hidenori Yanagi, Naohiro Tomita, SURGERY, SURGERY, 157(4), 743 - 751, Apr. 2015 , Refereed
    Summary:Background. The response of positive mesorectal lymph nodes to chemoradiotherapy remains largely unstudied in patients with rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the requirements of the total regression of positive nodes treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods. The response of the primary tumor was evaluated according to the tumor regression grade (TRG 0-4) in resected specimens, and positive lymph nodes were assessed according to the lymph node regression grade (LRG 1-3), with TRG 4 and LRG 3 indicating total regression. We investigated the relationships among TRG, LRG, and the sizes of positive lymph nodes. Results. Among 178 patients, 68 (38.2%) had 200 positive lymph nodes. We first investigated the relationship of positive nodes to TRG and LRG and found that the response of the primary tumor to chemoradiotherapy correlated with the response of positive nodes. Next, we investigated the correlation between LRG and the size of positive nodes. At TRG I and 2, LRG score was not correlated with the positive node size. In contrast, at TRG 3, LRG score was correlated with the size of positive nodes. Next, our assessment of the relationship between the sizes of positive nodes and complete degeneration to LRG 3 showed that the most accurate cut-off score on receiver-operator-characteristics curve analysis was 6 mm in maximum diameter for TRG 3. Conclusion. The requirements of the total regression of positive nodes are I) degeneration of the primary tumor to TRG 3 and 2) a positive node diameter of <6 mm.
  • Arterial Chemoradiotherapy for Carcinomas of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear, Masayuki Fujiwara, Satoshi Yamamoto, Hiroshi Doi, Yasuhiro Takada, Soichi Odawara, Yasue Niwa, Reiichi Ishikura, Norihiko Kamikonya, Tomonori Terada, Nobuhiro Uwa, Kosuke Sagawa, Shozo Hirota, LARYNGOSCOPE, LARYNGOSCOPE, 125(3), 685 - 689, Mar. 2015 , Refereed
    Summary:Objectives/HypothesisThe purpose of this study was to estimate the efficacy of superselective arterial chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced carcinomas of the external auditory canal and middle ear. Study DesignA retrospective study of clinical data for consecutive patients with locally advanced carcinomas of the external auditory canal and middle ear. MethodsThirteen patients with locally advanced carcinomas of the external auditory canal and middle ear (T3: one patient, T4: 12 patients) were reviewed. The median follow-up duration in the living patients was 33 months. The total dose of radiation therapy was 60 Gy using conventional fractionation. Four, five, or six courses of a superselective arterial infusion (cisplatin 50 mg) were given weekly. ResultsThe overall survival and progression-free survival rates at 2 years, calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, were 58.7% and 53.8%, respectively. No late-phase adverse effects due to chemoradiation and no adverse effects due to catheterization were observed. ConclusionsThese results suggest that superselective arterial chemoradiation can be a treatment option for locally advanced carcinomas of the external auditory canal and middle ear.
  • The timing of surgery after preoperative short-course S-1 chemoradiotherapy with delayed surgery for T3 lower rectal cancer, Naohito Beppu, Nagahide Matsubara, Masashi Noda, Tomoki Yamano, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Naoki Yamanaka, Hidenori Yanagi, Naohiro Tomita, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COLORECTAL DISEASE, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COLORECTAL DISEASE, 29(12), 1459 - 1466, Dec. 2014 , Refereed
    Summary:The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of variations in clinical practice regarding the timing of surgery with short-course chemoradiotherapy with delayed surgery (SCRT-delay) for lower rectal cancer. A total of 171 patients with T3 N0-2 lower rectal cancer treated with SCRT-delay (25 Gy/10 fractions/5 days (S-1); days 1-10) were retrospectively evaluated. The median waiting period of 30 days was used as a discriminator (group A: waiting period, a parts per thousand currency sign30 days; group B: waiting period, a parts per thousand yen31 days). Preoperative treatment responses and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The mean waiting periods for groups A and B were 24.4 +/- 5.3 and 41.4 +/- 12.3 days, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in any of the clinical variables. The clinicopathological outcomes were as follows: T downstaging (43.5 vs 37.2 %; p = 0.400), negative yp N (67.1 vs 75.6 %; p = 0.218), pCR (7.1 vs 1.2 %; p = 0.119). The 5-year local recurrence-free survival (89.3 vs 87.6 %; p = 0.956), the recurrence-free survival (82.2 vs 78.8 %; p = 0.662), and the overall survival (88.5 vs 84.4 %; p = 0.741), all of which were similar between the two groups. The longer waiting period did not increase the tumor downstaging and not improve the oncological outcomes for T3 lower rectal cancer treated with SCRT-delay. In addition, considering that the impaired leukocyte response occurred during the sub-acute period, any time after the sub-acute period (day 12) up to 30 days after radiotherapy would be a suitable waiting period.
  • Erratum: Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer (Journal of Radiation Research), Hiroshi Doi, Naohito Beppu, Soichi Odawara, Masao Tanooka, Yasuhiro Takada, Yasue Niwa, Masayuki Fujiwara, Fumihiko Kimura, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, Journal of Radiation Research, Journal of Radiation Research, 55(6), 1202, Nov. 01 2014 , Refereed
  • Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer (vol 54, pg 1118, 2013), Hiroshi Doi, Naohito Beppu, Soichi Odawara, Masao Tanooka, Yasuhiro Takada, Yasue Niwa, Masayuki Fujiwara, Fumihiko Kimura, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, 55(6), 1202 - 1202, Nov. 2014 , Refereed
  • Body mass index can affect gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy, Hiroshi Doi, Fumiko Ishimaru, Masao Tanooka, Hiroyuki Inoue, Soichi Odawara, Yasuhiro Takada, Yasue Niwa, Masayuki Fujiwara, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shingo Yamamoto, Shozo Hirota, ONCOLOGY LETTERS, ONCOLOGY LETTERS, 7(1), 209 - 214, Jan. 2014 , Refereed
  • Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer, Hiroshi Doi, Naohito Beppu, Soichi Odawara, Masao Tanooka, Yasuhiro Takada, Yasue Niwa, Masayuki Fujiwara, Fumihiko Kimura, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, 54(6), 1118 - 1124, Nov. 2013 , Refereed
    Summary:The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials.
  • Three-dimensional radiochromic film dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy using a spiral water phantom, Masao Tanooka, Hiroshi Doi, Hideharu Miura, Hiroyuki Inoue, Yasue Niwa, Yasuhiro Takada, Masayuki Fujiwara, Toshiyuki Sakai, Kiyoshi Sakamoto, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, 54(6), 1153 - 1159, Nov. 2013 , Refereed
    Summary:We validated 3D radiochromic film dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using a newly developed spiral water phantom. The phantom consists of a main body and an insert box, each of which has an acrylic wall thickness of 3 mm and is filled with water. The insert box includes a spiral film box used for dose-distribution measurement, and a film holder for positioning a radiochromic film. The film holder has two parallel walls whose facing inner surfaces are equipped with spiral grooves in a mirrored configuration. The film is inserted into the spiral grooves by its side edges and runs along them to be positioned on a spiral plane. Dose calculation was performed by applying clinical VMAT plans to the spiral water phantom using a commercial Monte Carlo-based treatment-planning system, Monaco, whereas dose was measured by delivering the VMAT beams to the phantom. The calculated dose distributions were resampled on the spiral plane, and the dose distributions recorded on the film were scanned. Comparisons between the calculated and measured dose distributions yielded an average gamma-index pass rate of 87.0% (range, 91.2-84.6%) in nine prostate VMAT plans under 3 mm/3% criteria with a dose-calculation grid size of 2 mm. The pass rates were increased beyond 90% (average, 91.1%; range, 90.1-92.0%) when the dose-calculation grid size was decreased to 1 mm. We have confirmed that 3D radiochromic film dosimetry using the spiral water phantom is a simple and cost-effective approach to VMAT dose verification.
  • Dosimetric and delivery characterizations of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy for maxillary cancer, Hideharu Miura, Masayuki Fujiwara, Masao Tanooka, Hiroshi Doi, Hiroyuki Inoue, Yasuhiro Takada, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, 53(5), 785 - 790, Sep. 2012 , Refereed
    Summary:We compared the efficiency and accuracy of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for maxillary cancer. Plans for gantry rotation angles of 360 and 180 (full-arc and half-arc VMAT) were created for six maxillary cancer cases with the Monaco treatment planning system, and delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Full-arc and half-arc VMAT were compared with regard to homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), mean dose to normal brain, total monitor units (MU), delivery times, root mean square (r.m.s.) gantry accelerations (degrees/s(2)), and rims. gantry angle errors (degrees). The half-arc VMAT plans achieved comparable HI and Cl to the full-arc plans. Mean doses to the normal brain and brainstem with the half-arc VMAT plans were on average 16% and 17% lower than those with the full-arc VMAT plans. For other organs at risk (OARs), no significant DVH differences were observed between plans. Half-arc VMAT resulted in 11% less total MU and 20% shorter delivery time than the full-arc VMAT, while r.m.s. gantry acceleration and rims. gantry angle error during half-arc VMAT delivery were 30% and 23% less than those during full-arc VMAT delivery, respectively. Furthermore, the half-arc VMAT plans were comparable with the full-arc plans regarding close homogeneity and conformity in maxillary cancer, and provided a statistical decrease in mean dose to OAR, total MU, delivery time and gantry angle error. Half-arc VMAT plans may be a suitable treatment option in radiotherapy for maxillary cancer.
  • Long-term Sequential Changes of Radiation Proctitis and Angiopathy in Rats, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Yasuhiro Takada, Masayuki Fujiwara, Keita Tsuboi, Hideharu Miura, Hiroyuki Inoue, Masao Tanooka, Takeshi Nakamura, Toshiyuki Shikata, Takeshi Kimura, Tohru Tsujimura, Shozo Hirota, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, JOURNAL OF RADIATION RESEARCH, 53(2), 217 - 224, Mar. 2012 , Refereed
    Summary:The purpose of the present study was to establish an experimental rat model for late radiation proctitis, and to examine the assessment strategy for late radiation proctitis. A total of 57 Wistar rats were used. Fourty-five of the rats were exposed to selective rectal irradiation with a single fraction of 25 Gy. These rats were sacrificed at the 4th, 12th, 24th, and 37th week following irradiation. The remaining 12 rats comprised the control group without irradiation. The rectal mucosa of each rat was evaluated macroscopically and pathologically. The number of vessels in the rectal mucosa was counted microscopically. In addition, the vascular stenosis was evaluated. In the results, the degree of clinical and macroscopic findings decreased following acute proctitis and developed later. In the pathological examination, mucosal changes and microangiopathy were followed up, as well. The absolute number of vessels in the rectum was the greatest at the 12th week following irradiation and was the lowest in the control group. The severity of the microangiopathy was also well evaluated. To conclude, we established an animal experimental model of late radiation proctitis, and also established an assessment strategy to evaluate objectively the severity of late radiation proctitis with focusing on microangiopathy using an animal experimental model. This model can be used as an animal experimental model of radiation-induced microangiopathy.
  • EFFICACY OF POLAPREZINC FOR ACUTE RADIATION PROCTITIS IN A RAT MODEL, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Yasuhiro Takada, Masayuki Fujiwara, Keita Tsuboi, Hiroyuki Inoue, Masao Tanooka, Takeshi Nakamura, Toshiyuki Shikata, Tohru Tsujimura, Shozo Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 80(3), 877 - 884, Jul. 2011 , Refereed
    Summary:Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to standardize the experimental rat model of radiation proctitis and to examine the efficacy of polaprezinc on radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 54 female Wistar rats (5 weeks old) were used. The rats were divided into three groups: those treated with polaprezinc (PZ+), those treated with base alone, exclusive of polaprezinc (PZ-), and those treated without any medication (control). All the rats were irradiated to the rectum. Polaprezinc was prepared as an ointment. The ointment was administered rectally each day after irradiation. All rats were killed on the 10th day after irradiation. The mucosal changes were evaluated endoscopically and pathologically. The results were graded from 0 to 4 and compared according to milder or more severe status, as applicable. Results: According to the endoscopic findings, the proportion of mild changes in the PZ+, PZ-, and control group was 71.4%, 25.0%, and 14.3% respectively. On pathologic examination, the proportion of low-grade findings in the PZ+, PZ-, and control group was 80.0%, 58.3%, and 42.9% for mucosa! damage, 85.0%, 41.7%, and 42.9% for a mild degree of inflammation, and 50.0%, 33.3%, and 4.8% for a shallow depth of inflammation, respectively. The PZ+ group tended to have milder mucosal damage than the other groups, according to all criteria used. In addition, significant differences were observed between the PZ+ and control groups regarding the endoscopic findings, degree of inflammation, and depth of inflammation. Conclusions: This model was confirmed to be a useful experimental rat model for radiation proctitis. The results of the present study have demonstrated the efficacy of polaprezinc against acute radiation-induced rectal disorders using the rat model. (c) 2011 Elsevier Inc.

Books etc

  • Lung Cancer - Modern Multidisciplinary Management, Hiroshi Doi, Kozo Kuribayashi, Contributor, Definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: current status and future perspectives., IntechOpen,   2021 02
  • Oral Science in Japan 2018, Kazuhiro Kitajima, Kazuma Noguchi, Tatsuya Tsuchitani, Hiroshi Doi, Shuji Kanda, Kuniyasu Moridera, Kazuki Takaoka, Koichiro Yamakado, Hiromitsu Kishimoto, Contributor, Usefulness of quantitative bone SPECT/CT for evaluating response to antibiotics therapy in patients with osteomyelitis of mandible, Japanese Stomatological Society,   2019
  • Management of Chronic Liver Diseases - Recent Advances, Hiroshi Doi, Hiroya Shiomi, Ryoong-Jin Oh, Contributor, Stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma., InTech,   2018 07 , 9781789234619

Conference Activities & Talks

  • 肝腫瘍への放射線治療の5W1H〜when, where, who, what, why, and how〜, Hiroshi Doi, 第138回放射線治療かたろう会,   2018 12 08 , 招待有り

Misc

  • 前立腺シード療法における連結型シードと分離型シードのDosimetry比較, 稲田正浩, 中松清志, 福田浩平, 建部仁志, 石川一樹, 土井啓至, 金森修一, 西村恭昌, Japanese Journal of Radiology, 37, Suppl., 43, 43,   2019 02 , https://jglobal.jst.go.jp/detail?JGLOBAL_ID=201902215321108641
  • 当院における頸部食道癌に対する強度変調放射線治療の成績, 稲田正浩, 石川一樹, 中松清志, 植原拓也, 和田祐太郎, 福田浩平, 阿南慎平, 土井啓至, 金森修一, 西村恭昌, 日本放射線腫瘍学会高精度放射線外部照射部会学術大会プログラム・抄録集, 32nd, 56,   2019 , https://jglobal.jst.go.jp/detail?JGLOBAL_ID=201902237244278957
  • 慢性活動性EBウイルス感染症(CAEBV)に対し放射線治療を行った1例, 加藤 貴, 高田 康弘, 冨士原 将之, 鈴木 公美, 土井 啓至, 上紺屋 憲彦, 廣田 省三, 岡田 昌也, 小川 啓恭, Japanese Journal of Radiology, 36, Suppl., 36, 36,   2018 02
  • ステンレス製髄内釘の線量分布への影響―ポリマーゲル線量計を用いた線量評価―, 冨士原将之, 田ノ岡征雄, 石田敏久, 若山司, 小坂賢吾, 樽谷和雄, 鈴木公美, 加藤貴, 高田康弘, 土井啓至, 土井啓至, 上紺屋憲彦, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫瘍学会高精度放射線外部照射部会学術大会プログラム・抄録集, 30th, 62,   2017 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/201702283554298767
  • 口腔装置(マウスピース)によるセットアップエラー低減の遡及的検証, 土井啓至, 土井啓至, 田ノ岡征雄, 石田敏久, 森寺邦康, 一宮賢治, 樽谷和雄, 中島浩樹, 春井章吾, 安藤新, 上野敬司, 北島一宏, 若山司, 酒井敏行, 高田康弘, 冨士原将之, 上紺屋憲彦, 岸本裕充, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫瘍学会高精度放射線外部照射部会学術大会プログラム・抄録集, 30th, 47,   2017 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/201702284766726633
  • Current status and perspective of stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumors, Hiroshi Doi, 4, 5, 20,   2017 , Refereed
  • VMATにおけるガントリ回転角度の影響, 三浦英治, 冨士原将之, 田ノ岡征雄, 土井啓至, 井上裕之, 高田康弘, 上紺屋憲彦, 廣田省三, 医学物理 Supplement, 32, 1, 151,   2012 04 01 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/201402272876761760
  • Radiation oncology has inspired me., JASTRO Newsletter, 106, 38, 39,   2012 , 招待有り
  • An initial report of polaprezinc suppositories to radiation proctitis, Hiroshi Doi, N. Kamikonya, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, K. Tsuboi, H. Inoue, M. Tanooka, S. Hirota, T. Nakamura, T. Shikata, T. Hamaguchi, Japanese Journal of Clinical Radiology, 55, 443, 449,   2010 03 01 , https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=77949851071&origin=inward
    Summary:Although radiation proctitis is one of popular adverse effects, standard treatments are not established. We reported 5 cases with the administration of polaprezinc suppositories to radiation proctitis. We made polaprezinc suppositories and administered to 5 patients with radiation proctitis. It was possible to administer it safely. 3 cases have the improvement of the symptoms. And one case had endoscopic findings improved significantly. Polaprezinc may be one of the treatments to radiation proctitis.
  • The midterm results of concurrent superselective arterial chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear, Masayuki Fujiwara, Satoshi Yamamoto, Hiroshi Doi, Yasuhiro Takada, Reiichi Ishikura, Norihiko Kamikonya, Shozo Hirota, Tomonori Terada, Nobuo Saeki, Nobuhiro Uwa, Toukeibu Gan, 36, 4, 473, 477,   2010 , 10.5981/jjhnc.36.473
    Summary:This study retrospectively reports the midterm results of concurrent superselective arterial chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear. Fifteen patients (7 males and 8 females) who were treated for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear between March 2003 and July 2009 were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up period was 14 months (4-44 months). All patients were staged according to the Pittsburgh staging system by Moody as follows: T1 (n=1), T2 (n=1), T3 (n=1), T4 (n=12). Thirteen patients had squamous cell carcinoma, one had adenocarcinoma, and one had undifferentiated carcinoma. All catheterizations were performed via a transfemoral approach by the Seldinger method. After identifying the feeding arteries of the primary tumor, cisplatin (50 mg/body) was injected. Simultaneously a cisplatin antagonist, sodium thiosulfate, was administered intravenously. Four or five courses of arterial infusion were given weekly. The catheter was removed after each session. External beam irradiation was performed five times a week at 2 Gy per fraction. Total dose ranged from 40 to 60 Gy (median: 60 Gy). The toxicity was evaluated by CTC-AE ver. 3.0. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 73.4%, and progression free survival (PFS) rate was 53.3% for all patients. Concerning acute toxicity, one patient had Grade 3 dermatitis, and one had Grade 3 leucopenia. No catheter-related complications and no treatment-related deaths were observed. No severe late complications were observed, but one patient had a mild inflammation on the subcutaneous tissue. These results are comparable with those of other reports, suggesting that this method for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear is acceptable, but the OS rate and PFS rate need improvement. Further investigations are required with larger series to evaluate the long-term survival rate with this treatment. © 2010, Japan Society for Head and Neck Cancer. All rights reserved.
  • 放射線治療の現場から「がんプロッフェショナル養成プラン」を考える, 上紺屋憲彦, 土井啓至, 田ノ岡征雄, 井上裕之, 高田康弘, 冨士原将之, 廣田省三, 日本癌治療学会誌, 44, 2, 332,   2009 09 14 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902259908750280
  • 口腔癌に対する超選択的動注化学療法併用放射線治療, 冨士原将之, 山本聡, 野口一馬, 森寺邦康, 土井啓至, 高田康弘, 石藏礼一, 上紺屋憲彦, 浦出雅裕, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 21, Supplement 1, 217,   2009 08 19 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902210261826409
  • 放射線性直腸炎に対する亜鉛製剤経直腸投与の経験, 土井啓至, 井上裕之, 田ノ岡征雄, 上紺屋憲彦, 高田康弘, 冨士原将之, 志方敏幸, 濱口常男, 門林宗男, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 21, Supplement 1, 127,   2009 08 19 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902231725489165
  • 当院における骨転移症例に対する緩和放射線治療の現状と分析, 高田康弘, 土井啓至, 冨士原将之, 田ノ岡征雄, 井上裕之, 坪井慶太, 和泉正幸, 小田雅彦, 上紺屋憲彦, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 21, Supplement 1, 196,   2009 08 19 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902297742494521
  • 動物実験モデルによる放射線直腸障害に対する亜鉛製剤の有効性の評価, 土井啓至, 井上裕之, 上紺屋憲彦, 高田康弘, 冨士原将之, 坪井慶太, 田ノ岡征雄, 中川英雄, 小田雅彦, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 20, Supplement 1, 183,   2008 09 22 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902224120485455
  • 前立腺小線源治療における線源位置確認時のCT画像の評価, 高田康弘, 田ノ岡征雄, 土井啓至, 井上裕之, 冨士原将之, 上紺屋憲彦, 坪井慶太, 和泉正幸, 小田雅彦, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 20, Supplement 1, 195,   2008 09 22 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902243067377526
  • TBI時の補正方法の違いによる肺線量のDVH評価, 冨士原将之, 土井啓至, 井上裕之, 中川英雄, 田ノ岡征雄, 小田雅彦, 平山伸一, 高田康弘, 上紺屋憲彦, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 20, Supplement 1, 174,   2008 09 22 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902254278515978
  • CT呼吸同期再構成法における呼吸数とヘリカルピッチの検討, 田ノ岡征雄, 酒井敏行, 中川英雄, 小田雅彦, 平山伸一, 井上裕之, 土井啓至, 高田康弘, 冨士原将之, 上紺屋憲彦, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 20, Supplement 1, 258,   2008 09 22 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902265742319070
  • ポータルイメージ‐DRR自動照合ソフトウェアの開発と検証, 井上裕之, 田ノ岡征雄, 土井啓至, 中川英雄, 小田雅彦, 平山伸一, 高田康弘, 冨士原将之, 上紺屋憲彦, 廣田省三, 日本放射線腫よう学会誌, 20, Supplement 1, 260,   2008 09 22 , http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/200902299085563880
  • 上咽頭癌の化学放射線療法後に右内頸動脈瘤破裂を来した一例, 石川 一樹, 立野 沙織, 井上 恵理, 稲田 正浩, 土井 啓至, 中松 清志, 金森 修一, 西村 恭昌, 日本癌治療学会学術集会抄録集, 57回, P4, 6,   2019 10
  • weekly CBCTとDIRを用いた中咽頭癌患者のIMRTにおける解剖学的変化と線量変化, 石川 一樹, 稲田 正浩, 福田 浩平, 土井 啓至, 中松 清志, 金森 修一, 西村 恭昌, 日本癌治療学会学術集会抄録集, 56回, P64, 2,   2018 10
  • Pravastatin Reduces Radiation-Induced Damage to Normal Tissues, H. Doi, S. Matsumoto, S. Odawara, T. Shikata, M. Tanooka, K. Kitajima, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, T. Tsujimura, N. Kamikonya, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 96, 2, E560, E561,   2016 10
  • Polaprezinc Reduces Radiation Induced Apoptosis in Normal Intestine and the Severity of Radiation Dermatitis in Mice, H. Doi, S. Odawara, T. Shikata, H. Suzuki, Y. Niwa, M. Tanooka, K. Kosaka, K. Tarutani, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, N. Kamikonya, T. Tsujimura, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 93, 3, E532, E532,   2015 11
  • Polaprezinc Protects Intestinal Epithelium From Radiation-Induced Damage in Mice, S. Odawara, H. Doi, T. Tsujimura, T. Shikata, H. Suzuki, K. Kosaka, H. Inoue, M. Tanooka, Y. Takada, Y. Niwa, M. Fujiwara, N. Kamikonya, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 90, S782, S782,   2014 09
  • Acceptance of sphincter-preserving surgery for T3 lower rectal cancer after short-course radiotherapy with delayed surgery., Naohito Beppu, Hidenori Yanagi, Naoki Yamanaka, Hiroshi Doi, Norihiko Kamikonya, Masafumi Noda, Naohiro Tomita, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 32, 3,   2014 01
  • Carbon-Fiber Couch Modeling Optimization for Monaco VMAT Planning and Delivery, M. Tanooka, H. Inoue, H. Doi, H. Miura, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, F. Ishimaru, K. Sakamoto, N. Kamikonya, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 84, 3, S747, S748,   2012 11
  • Hypothyroidism After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: The Retrospective DVH Analysis of 75 Patients - Volume of Thyroid Gland Spared From Doses Can Be a New Dose Constraint for Treatment Planning?, M. Fujiwara, N. Kamikonya, M. Tanooka, H. Miura, H. Doi, Y. Takada, T. Terada, N. Uwa, K. Sagawa, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 84, 3, S520, S520,   2012 11
  • Impact of Choice of Algorithm and Clip Box Position on the Automatic Image Registration for Prostate Cancer, H. Inoue, M. Tanooka, E. Miura, H. Doi, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, K. Yasumasa, K. Sakamoto, N. Kamikonya, S. Hirota, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, 47, S193, S193,   2011 09
  • Impact of Choice of Algorithm and Clip box Position on the Automatic Image Registration for Prostate Cancer Treatment, H. Inoue, M. Tanooka, H. Doi, E. Miura, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, K. Yasumasa, K. Sakamoto, N. Kamikonya, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 81, 2, S774, S775,   2011
  • Efficacy of Polaprezinc to Acute Radiation Proctitis using an Animal Experimental Model, H. Doi, N. Kamikonya, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, H. Inoue, M. Tanooka, T. Nakamura, T. Shikata, T. Tsujimura, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 78, 3, S635, S636,   2010
  • Novel Spiral Phantom for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Delivery Verification, M. Tanooka, T. Sakai, H. Inoue, H. Doi, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, K. Yasumasa, K. Sakamoto, N. Kamikonya, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 78, 3, S769, S769,   2010
  • Convenient Quality Check for Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) using the ImageJ, H. Inoue, M. Tanooka, H. Doi, M. Oda, Y. Takada, M. Fujiwara, K. Yasumasa, K. Sakamoto, N. Kamikonya, S. Hirota, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS, 78, 3, S765, S765,   2010

Awards & Honors

  •   2020 07 , 近畿大学医学会賞, Stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial pneumonia: a review. Int J Clin Oncol, 24(8):899-909, 2019
  •   2020 02 , The 3rd International Cancer Research Symposium, Best Performance Award
  •   2018 02 , International Institute of Anticancer Research, 'Exceptional Quality Paper', Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors: Current Status and Perspectives
  •   2011 11 , Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology, Scientific Award of the 24th Annual Meeting of JASTRO
  •   2008 10 , Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO), Poster Award

Research Grants & Projects

  • Hyogo College of Medicine, Polaprezinc Reduces Radiation Induced Apoptosis in Normal Intestine and the Severity of Radiation Dermatitis in Mice. (American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 57th Annual Meeting)