MIYAZAKI Yusuke

Department of Environmental ManagementAssociate Professor

Last Updated :2024/06/18

■Researcher basic information

Degree

  • Ph.D.(2013/03 The University of Tokyo)

Research Field

  • Environmental science/Agricultural science / Social-ecological systems

■Career

Career

  • 2022/04 - Today  Kindai UniversityDepartment of Environmental Management, Faculty of AgricultureAssociate Professor
  • 2021/04 - 2022/03  Shiraume Gakuen CollegeDepartment of Child Education and WelfareAssociate Professor
  • 2019/04 - 2022/03  Wayo Women's University家政学部家政福祉学科非常勤講師
  • 2016/04 - 2021/03  Shiraumegakuen CollegeThe Department of Child Education and Welfare講師
  • 2013/04 - 2016/03  神奈川県立生命の星・地球博物館日本学術振興会特別研究員PD

Educational Background

  • 2010/04 - 2013/03  東京大学大学院  農学生命科学研究科  生圏システム学専攻 博士課程
  • 2008/04 - 2010/03  東京大学大学院  農学生命科学研究科  生圏システム学専攻 修士課程
  • 2004/04 - 2008/03  Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology  Faculty of Marine Science  Department of Marine Policy and Culture

■Research activity information

Award

  • 2013/03 東京大学大学院農学生命科学研究科 研究科長賞
  • 2008/03 一般社団法人 楽水会 楽水会賞

Paper

  • Qualities and skills of junior college students expected by kindergartens, nursery schools, and social welfare facilities: Based on a questionnaire survey in the Tokyo Metropolitan area
    Hanabara, M; M. Nakayama; M. Takiguchi; A. Komatsu; M. Agata; S. Minamoto; S. Nagai; F. Satoh; Y. Miyazaki; A. Satoh; R. Asano
    Annual Report of the Shiraume Gakuen University and College, The Shiraume Institute of Child Studies (28) 27 - 39 2023/09 [Refereed]
  • Kawanishi, R; Y. Miyazaki; T. P. Satoh
    Systematic Parasitology Springer Science and Business Media LLC 0165-5752 2023/01 [Refereed]
  • Voucher-based records of Rhinogobius nagoyae (Perciformes: Gobiidae) from Tama-gawa River flowing into the Tokyo Bay, central Japan
    Miyazaki, Y; R. Nomura; J. Kato, R. Wakiya
    Bulletin of the Biogeogrphical Society of Japan 77 54 - 58 2022/12 [Refereed]
     
    Two specimens of Rhinogoboius nagoyae (23.1–30.6 mm in standard length), were collected from the lower reach of the Tama-gawa River, which flows into the Tokyo Bay, central Japan. The domestic distribution range of this species is from Ryukyu Islands to the northernmost Honshu Island. Although the locality of specimens is at the middle for its range, voucher-based records have not been reported from the Tokyo Bay tributary basin. Thus, the present specimens, which are described in this article, represents the first voucher-based records of R. nagoyae from the bay basin.
  • 魚類相からみた東京の水圏環境
    宮崎佑介
    水環境学会誌 45(A) (7) 234 - 237 2022/07 [Invited]
  • Terui, A., S. Kim, C. L. Dolph, T. Kadoya, Y. Miyazaki
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 118 (47) e2105574118  0027-8424 2021/11 [Refereed]
     
    Significance Larger ecosystems support more species; this ubiquitous pattern is the foundation of current conservation schemes. However, many ecosystems possess a complex spatial structure that cannot be represented by area, and the role of such complexity in regulating biodiversity patterns is largely unknown. Here, we use theory and extensive fish community data to show that ecosystem size and complexity dictate riverine biodiversity. We found that larger and more branched “complex” river networks harbored greater species richness due to increased space and environmental heterogeneity. The complexity effect was comparable to the size effect, and this pattern has emerged regardless of ecological contexts. Our discovery illustrates a fundamental ecological law in complex ecosystems, laying the groundwork for future research exploring macroecological patterns.
  • 田中翔大; 下光利明; 瀬能宏; 宮崎佑介
    神奈川県立博物館研究報告(自然科学) (49) 107 - 118 2020/03 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Murase; J. Honda; J. Yamaide; H. Senou
    Biodiversity and Conservation 29 (2) 625 - 642 2020/02 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Murase
    ZooKeys 904 89 - 101 2020/01 [Refereed]
  • 駿河湾から得られた標本に基づくアオマトウダイの北限記録
    宮崎佑介; 鈴木香里武; 瀬能宏
    日本生物地理学会会報 74 90 - 92 2019/12 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Teramura; H. Senou
    Zookeys 843 117 - 128 2019/05 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y
    Japanese Journal of Conservation Ecology 23 167 - 176 2018/05 
    To determine directions for future developments in citizen science, we examined differences between the Japaneselanguage concepts of 科学, 研究, and 市民 and the English-language concepts of science, research, and citizen. We found that the English word “research” is important in denoting new findings, whereas the corresponding Japanese word “研究” does not communicate novelty. East Asians, particularly those from Japan, tend to apply the word “citizen” to adults, whereas Europeans and North Americans apply the word to members of all generations, including babies and children. We also examined the applicability of the new concept of “市民科学” (citizen science), as defined by Sasaki et al. (2016), in studies of fish. Based on our findings, the use of “市民科学” (citizen science) is suitable for describing the process of becoming a scientist as well as indirect contributions to science. We also discussed the value of pursuing Japanese originality in science.
  • Record of a juvenile specimen of the veilfin, Velifer hypselopterus (Lampridiformes: Veliferidae), from Yokohama Port, western Tokyo Bay, Japan
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Fukui
    Bulletin of the Biogeographical Society of Japan 72 289 - 291 2018/01 [Refereed]
  • 幼児教育・保育の実践現場と魚介類の関わり
    宮崎佑介
    樂水 (861) 11 - 13 2018/01
  • Decadal changes in the fish assemblage structure at a modified shore site in an urbanised estuarine canal
    Murase, A.; Y. Miyazaki; M. Moteki; H. Kohno
    Lar mer 55 (1-2) 37 - 51 2017/08 [Refereed]
  • Murase, A.; R. Inui; R. Miki; Y. Miyazaki
    ZooKeys PENSOFT PUBL 645 71 - 83 1313-2989 2017 [Refereed]
     
    Five specimens of a threatened goby, Apocryptodon punctatus (21.2-40.1 mm in standard length), were collected at a mudflat site of Kushima City, Miyazaki Prefecture, Kyushu, southern Japan over two seasons, autumn (September 2015) and spring (April 2016). A review of distributional records of A. punctatus revealed that this population represents the southernmost record of the species in Japanese waters, and is isolated ca. 200 km south-southwest from the nearest point of the main range of the species along the Pacific coast of Japan. Publicising this population will help conserve it and its vulnerable habitat.
  • Terui, A.; Y. Miyazaki
    Limnology SPRINGER JAPAN KK 18 (1) 121 - 129 1439-8621 2017/01 [Refereed]
     
    In river systems, considerable debate exists as to why small-scale conservation with a primary focus on habitat quality brings little improvement to biological communities. To reveal potential causes of the enigmatic consequences, further explorations should focus on how species' response to local environments is determined within a watershed. Here, we examined how immigration potential influences habitat associations of four diadromous fishes in the Shubuto River system in Hokkaido, Japan: sculpins (Cottus sp. ME and C. hangiongensis), gobies (Gymnogobius opperiens) and sea lamprey larvae (Lethenteron japonicum). We used closeness to the sea (i.e., distance from the sea) as a proxy for immigration potential, since the source of immigrants of the diadromous fishes is the river mouth. A multilevel modeling approach revealed that immigration potential had a "bottom-up effect" on local habitat-abundance relationships (current velocity and substrate coarseness), but habitat preferences did not vary along the gradient of immigration potential. This likely reflects the limited dispersal capabilities of the study species, whereby shorter travel distances may greatly enhance colonization success. Our study raises the possibility that the effectiveness of small-scale riverine conservation can be improved by selecting areas where successful colonization would be expected. Explicitly incorporating this consideration into conservation decision-making would help achieve greater success in environmental restoration and preservation actions.
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Murase; R. Sahara; A. Angulo; H. Senou
    Ecological Research SPRINGER JAPAN KK 32 (1) 89 - 93 0912-3814 2017/01 [Refereed]
     
    Many biodiversity databases have been launched in recent years. Various species of certain developed taxa, such as fish, quadrupeds, and butterflies, are currently able to be photographically identified, in particular for ecological and biogeographic studies. However, there are problems that result from registration of images from countries with different primary languages. In this study, we provide an example of the challenges associated with registering fish images, specifically one case that has functioned as a voucher for the range extension of Labrisomus jenkinsi (Heller and Snodgrass, 1903) (Perciformes: Labrisomidae) from the Galapagos Islands to the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. The fish image database in question belongs to a Japanese public museum [the Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History; the online version (FishPix) is provided by the museum and the National Museum of Nature and Science]. We propose that there are problems associated with image registration caused by using different languages. Furthermore, these challenges should be a common subject for discussion among museums as they attempt to accumulate biodiversity data from citizens in the future.
  • A voucher specimen based record of Tachysurus aurantiacus (Siluriformes, Bagridae) from Oyodo-gawa River system in the Miyazaki Prefecture, southern Japan
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase
    Bulletin of the Biogeographical Society of Japan 71 265 - 270 2017/01 [Refereed]
  • The northernmost record of a cardinalfish species, Ostorhinchus fleurieu (Perciformes, Apogonidae), based on a specimen from Kadogawa Bay, Miyazaki Prefecture, southern Japan
    Murase, A; M. Wada; R. Miki; Y. Miyazaki
    Bulletin of the Biogeographical Society of Japan 71 183 - 187 2017/01 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Terui
    Ichthyological Research SPRINGER JAPAN KK 63 (3) 317 - 323 1341-8998 2016/07 [Refereed]
     
    The longitudinal and cross-sectional differences in habitat use between Gymnogobius oppeiens and Gymnogobius urotaenia (sister species) were investigated from June to July 2011 in the Shubuto River System, southwestern Hokkaido, Japan. Generalized linear model revealed that watercourse distance from the sea had a significant influence on the abundances of both G. opperiens and G. urotaenia but in different ways. That is, G. opperiens had a distributional peak at the middle reaches, but the abundance of G. urotaenia gradually decreased with increasing distance from the sea. In addition, the lateral distribution patterns of G. opperiens and G. urotaenia, and all the local environmental variables were significantly different between the fringe and the mid-channel habitats. Both G. opperiens and G. urotaenia were most abundant along the margins of the river. However, the former species was frequently collected from the mid-channel, whereas the latter species was never collected in the habitat. These results coincide with previous observations asserting habitat segregation of the two goby species. The differential habitat use between the two species may be related to the differences in their population sizes and morphologies.
  • Terui, A.; Y. Miyazaki
    Limnology SPRINGER JAPAN KK 17 (2) 143 - 149 1439-8621 2016/04 [Refereed]
     
    A major goal of stream ecology is to identify environmental gradients that shape riverine communities. We examined the relative importance of three ecological factors that have been hypothesized to influence a longitudinal pattern of fish diversity: habitat capacity, heterogeneity and immigration of diadromous fishes. Field surveys were carried out in the entire network of the Shubuto River system, Hokkaido, Japan. A hierarchical partitioning approach revealed that distance from the sea, a proxy for immigration potential of diadromous fishes, had the greatest explanatory capacity, by which 24.9 % of variation in fish species richness was explained. Habitat capacity (approximated by catchment area) was also identified as a significant predictor of fish diversity, whereas habitat heterogeneity brought little improvement to the model performance. These results reflect the fish fauna of the Shubuto River system, in which diadromous fishes are dominant in both abundance and species richness.
  • Yusuke Miyazaki
    Japanese Journal of Ecology Tohoku University 66 (1) 237 - 246 0021-5007 2016 [Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Teramura; H. Senou
    ZooKeys PENSOFT PUBL 569 123 - 133 1313-2989 2016 [Refereed]
     
    An apparent illegal introduction of Lepomis macrochirus macrochirus from Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, is reported based on a juvenile specimen and a photograph of two adults collected on 14 June 2015 and deposited in the Kangawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History. The specimens and photographs were initially reported on the internet-based social networking site, Twitter. Two specimens of Carassius auratus, including an aquarium form, were also reported at the same locality and date, suggesting that the illegal introductions originated from an aquarium release. Our report demonstrates an example of web data mining in the discipline of Citizen Science.
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Terui
    Ichthyological Research SPRINGER JAPAN KK 63 (1) 173 - 179 1341-8998 2016/01 [Refereed]
     
    We investigated the fluvial fish communities at 16 sites that cover the entire Shubuto River in northern Japan in July and September 2010. A total of 5,552.9 g of biomass and 980 individuals were identified as produced by and belonging to 11 species, and 7,079.7 g of biomass and 2,587 individuals were pinpointed as produced by and belonging to 17 species. The data on the 11 and 17 species were recorded in July and September 2010, respectively. The July and September data exhibited significant differences in individual and biomass compositions (G-test; both P < 0.001). The number of recorded amphidromous Gymnogobius opperiens and Rhinogobius sp. (a species complex of Rhinogobius brunneus) individuals was significantly affected by the interaction term between watercourse distance from the sea and sampling season (July or September). By contrast, no such significant influence was found for the biomass produced by the aforementioned species. Fisher's exact tests revealed that the G. opperiens and Rhinogobius sp. compositions during the growth stage (larva-juvenile vs. post-juvenile) significantly differed between July and September 2010. These results are probably attributed to part of the seasonal trend exhibited by the fish communities in the Shubuto River; that is, the spatial pattern of the fluvial fish communities from July to September is probably caused by an increase in the species occurrence and larval and juvenile recruitment of G. opperiens and Rhinogobius sp. migrating from the sea to the river.
  • Record of a hybrid of two gobiies, Mugilogobius abei and Mugilogobius sp. (Teleostei, Gobiidae), from an estuary of Nobeoka City, Miyazaki Prefecture, the eastern coast of Kyushu, Japan
    Murase, A; Y. Miyazaki; R. Miki; T. Mukai
    Bulletin of the Biogeographical Society of Japan 70 181 - 187 2015/12 [Refereed]
  • Akira Terui; Yusuke Miyazaki
    HYDROBIOLOGIA SPRINGER 760 (1) 189 - 196 0018-8158 2015/11 [Refereed]
     
    Long-distance dispersal of freshwater mussels (order Unionoida) has been assumed to occur mainly during a parasitic larval stage (glochidia) via movements of host fishes, but its empirical evidence is largely lacking. Here, we applied a "parasite-tag" approach to the riverine mussel Margaritifera laevis and its obligate host fish Oncorhynchus masou masou. This method examines the relationship between the prevalence of glochidia and distance from the nearest mussel population (i.e., the putative source of glochidia), a proxy that should quantify distance moved by host fish. We hypothesized that infected fish would be found in wider habitats at the end of the parasitic period (August) than at the beginning (July) if they were functioning as effective dispersal agents. In July, the prevalence of glochidia was highest in the vicinity of mussel beds but decreased rapidly with distance from the nearest mussel bed. In August, however, infected fish were distributed diffusively across the riverine network and dispersed over 4.8 km, demonstrating substantial dispersal of glochidia by the host fish. The results of our study build upon current knowledge of mussel's dispersal ecology by providing highly needed evidence: host fish can be effective in mediating long-distance dispersal of a riverine mussel species.
  • Yusuke Miyazaki; Atsunobu Murase; Masato Shiina; Ryuta Masui; Hiroshi Senou
    Journal of Coastal Research COASTAL EDUCATION & RESEARCH FOUNDATION 31 (4) 1035 - 1039 0749-0208 2015/07 [Refereed]
     
    We report a photograph of the rare triggerfish hybrid, Rhinecanthus aculeatus x R. rectangulus (order Tetraodontiformes; family Balistidae), from Miyako-jima Island, Ryukyu Islands, southern Japan, that was provided by a sport fisherman via WEB sakana-zukan (an online photographic database of fish in Japan). The image was registered in the Fish Image Database of the Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History to make it available for scientific scrutiny. Here we emphasize the importance of communication between citizens, such as fishermen, scuba divers, and others, and experts via the Internet, to make possible the processing of biodiversity information provided by citizens into museum collections. This communication contributes Global Biodiversity Information Facility data for various biological studies, such as those on taxonomy, morphology, fauna/flora, community ecology, and biogeography.
  • Akira Terui; Yusuke Miyazaki; Akira Yoshioka; Shin-Ichiro S Matsuzaki
    Royal Society open science 2 (6) 150034 - 150034 2015/06 [Refereed]
     
    Current theories predict that Allee effects should be widespread in nature, but there is little consistency in empirical findings. We hypothesized that this gap can arise from ignoring spatial contexts (i.e. spatial scale and heterogeneity) that potentially mask an existing fitness-density relationship: a 'cryptic' Allee effect. To test this hypothesis, we analysed how spatial contexts interacted with conspecific density to influence the fertilization rate of the freshwater mussel Margaritifera laevis. This sessile organism has a simple fertilization process whereby females filter sperm from the water column; this system enabled us to readily assess the interaction between conspecific density and spatial heterogeneity (e.g. flow conditions) at multiple spatial levels. Our findings were twofold. First, positive density-dependence in fertilization was undetectable at a population scale (approx. less than 50.5 m(2)), probably reflecting the exponential decay of sperm density with distance from the sperm source. Second, the Allee effect was confirmed at a local level (0.25 m(2)), but only when certain flow conditions were met (slow current velocity and shallow water depth). These results suggest that spatial contexts can mask existing Allee effects.
  • Yusuke Miyazaki; Yuji Ikeda; Hiroshi Senou
    Marine Biodiversity Records Cambridge University Press 8 e13  1755-2672 2015/04 [Refereed]
     
    Two specimens of Chromis notata (Pomacentridae) and one specimen of Sagamia geneionema (Gobiidae) were captured in Suttsu Bay, the Sea of Japan. These constitute the first records of the species from Hokkaido Island, northern Japan.
  • Arturo Angulo; Alex Molina-Arias; Atsunobu Murase; Yusuke Miyazaki; William Bussing; Myrna López
    Check List: the journal of biodiversity data Centro de Referencia em Informacao Ambiental 11 (3) 1666  1809-127X 2015 [Refereed]
     
    A checklist of the fishes of the Tusubres River basin, Pacific coast of Costa Rica, compiled from field and museum surveys is herein presented. A total of 54 species, representing 47 genera and 27 families, were recorded. Peripheral species were dominant (64.8%), followed by secondary freshwater fishes (20.4%) primary freshwater fishes accounted only for 14.8% of the total fish diversity. Eleotridae (6 spp.), Gobiidae (6 spp.), Poeciliidae (5 spp.) and Characidae (4 spp.) were the most diverse. Two species (Caranx sexfasciatus, Carangidae and Opisthonema libertate, Clupeidae) were new records for Costa Rican freshwaters, and two species (Gymnotus maculosus, Gymnotidae and Lebiasina boruca, Lebiasinidae) was found to have expanded ranges. An identification key and a complete photographic album of all fish species recorded in the basin are presented. The results of this investigation provide a framework for future studies on biogeography, ecology and conservation on fishes from this area.
  • Yusuke Miyazaki; Atsunobu Murase; Hiroshi Senou
    Management of Biological Invasions Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre 6 (1) 105 - 110 1989-8649 2015 [Refereed]
     
    Natural history museums provide permanent storage for specimen collections, including non-native species. We extracted the records for specimens and photographs of exotic non-native fishes collected in Japan by experts and citizens at the Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History, Japan. The museum began operation in 1994. The records of alien species known to be established in Japan (FSAK) consisted of 1756 specimens (789 lots) belonging to 29 species and 611 photographs (494 lots) of 25 species. Additionally, there were records of alien species that were introduced to Japan but not known to be established (FSUK) consisting of 23 specimens (23 lots) belonging to 11 species and of 46 photographs (31 lots) of 17 species. The FSAK could be classified as 22 primary freshwater, six diadromous, and one marine species, whereas the FSUK were classified as 12 primary freshwater, one diadromous, and six marine species. We identified a significant difference in the life-cycle types of FSAK and FSUK suggesting that fluvial species are established more easily than marine species, which reflects the biogeography of Japan. In addition, the records of FSUK were probably caused by an increase of aquarium fish introductions due to dereliction of pet fish, ejectment for pleasure, or crime by traders. The museum collections were mostly provided by experts, followed by citizens and other institutions. We also discussed the functions of a public museum of natural history for accumulating information and for citizen participation.
  • Citizen participation in augmenting a museum database enhances fish monitoring and public awareness
    Miyazaki, Y.; A. Murase; H. Senou
    Journal of Aquatic Marine Environmental Education Research 7 22 - 26 2014/12
  • Notes on the monthly change in composition of body size and life history in a stichaeid fish, Zoarchias glaber (Teleostei; Perciformes), at Kannonzaki, the eastern Miura Peninsula, Tokyo Bay
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase
    Bulletin of the Biogeographical Society of Japan 69 213 - 216 2014/12 [Refereed]
  • Ichthyofauna of the Kubo, Tochikura, and Ichinono river systems (Kitakami River drainage, northern Japan), with a comparison of predicted and surveyed species richness
    Miyazaki, Y.; M. Nakae; H. Senou
    Biodiversity Data Journal 2 e1093  2014/11 [Refereed]
  • Akira Terui; Yusuke Miyazaki; Akira Yoshioka; Kenzo Kaifu; Shin-ichiro S. Matsuzaki; Izumi Washitani
    Ecology and Evolution WILEY 4 (15) 3004 - 3014 2045-7758 2014/08 [Refereed]
     
    Unidirectional water flow results in the downstream-biased, asymmetric dispersal of many riverine organisms. However, little is known of how asymmetric dispersal influences riverine population structure and dynamics, limiting our ability to properly manage riverine organisms. A metapopulation of the freshwater pearl mussel Margaritifera laevis may be sensitive to river currents because mussels are repeatedly exposed to downstream drift during floods-a parasitic life stage is the only, limited period (similar to 40 days) during which larvae (glochidia) can move upstream with the aid of host fish. We hypothesized that water-mediated dispersal would overwhelm upstream dispersal via host fish, and therefore, that upstream subpopulations play a critical role as immigrant sources. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of both up-and downstream immigrant sources on the size of target subpopulations in the Shubuto River system, Hokkaido, Japan. We found that target subpopulation size was dependent on the upstream distribution range of reproductive subpopulations and the number of upstream tributaries, which are proxies for the number of potential immigrants moving downstream. In contrast, little influence was observed of downstream immigrant sources (proximity to downstream reproductive subpopulations). These results were consistent even after accounting for local environments and stream size. Our finding suggests that upstream subpopulations can be disproportionately important as immigrant sources when dispersal is strongly asymmetric.
  • Miyazaki, Y.; A. Murase; M. Shiina; K. Naoe; R. Nakashiro; J. Honda; J. Yamaide; H. Senou
    Biodiversity and Conservation SPRINGER 23 (9) 2383 - 2391 0960-3115 2014/08 [Refereed]
     
    The Internet has changed the way biologists communicate; this includes the collection of information on fish biology. This technological change may allow the possibility for biological monitoring by general citizens via the Internet. The Japanese Internet atlas of fishes, WEB sakana-zukan, has been in operation since 2002. It provides an opportunity to communicate and accumulate information on fish biology by amateur users, who consist mainly of sports fishing fans. This website has functioned not only as an entertainment and educational tool for users with an environmental and ichthyological interest. To date, more than 35,000 photographs of fishes have been registered on the website by more than 1,000 unique users, and more than 37,500 photographs of fishes have been posted in its bulletin board system (linking approximately 28,000 photographs to the website) by more than 2,000 unique users. As these photographs almost always include time and locality data, it is possible to provide distribution data by publishing the information as scientific papers or registering them as collections at the Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History (the Image Database of Fishes (KPM-NR) contributing to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility). If the communication method is developed and improved, various scientists will be able to collect much more biodiversity data from general citizens via the Internet.
  • Terui, A.; Y. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka; T. Kadoya; F. Jopp; I. Washitani
    Freshwater Science UNIV CHICAGO PRESS 33 (1) 112 - 123 2161-9549 2014/03 [Refereed]
     
    Local aggregations of unionoids (mussel beds) represent subpopulations constituting a riverine meta-population and are presumed to be linked by dispersal of parasitic mussel larvae (glochidia) on host fishes. We examined movement patterns of Masu Salmon (Oncorhynchus masou masou), the obligate host fish for the freshwater pearl mussel Margaritifera laevis, during the mussel's parasitic period to determine the dispersal potential of glochidia via host fish in the Shubuto River system, Hokkaido, Japan. We conducted a mark-recapture study in a 650-m river section to describe the distance and directionality of host fish movement, and we used fyke net sampling to quantify the number of host fish moving from mainstem rivers to tributaries. Most individuals of Masu Salmon captured in the study were infected with glochidia of M. laevis. The displacement distance of infected fishes ranged from 37.5 m downstream to 512.5 m upstream (mean = 36.5 m upstream from marking location). The dispersal kernel based on a diffusion-advection model represented a leptokurtic distribution with a fat-tailed upstream bias, but most recaptured fish remained near the initial capture location. Movement of fish from mainstem rivers to tributaries was strongly affected by differences in water temperature among tributaries. Most individuals moved to cooler tributaries, but tributaries did not support populations of M. laevis. These results suggest that glochidial dispersal via host fish is important for local recruitment and upstream dispersal, but dispersal to tributaries may be a source of mortality for M. laevis.
  • Atsunobu Murase; Arturo Angulo; Yusuke Miyazaki; William A. Bussing; Myrna I. López
    Check List: the journal of biodiversity data Centro de Referencia em Informacao Ambiental 10 (6) 1401 - 1413 1809-127X 2014 [Refereed]
     
    A checklist of the marine and estuarine fishes of the inner part of the Gulf of Nicoya, Pacific coast of Costa Rica, Central America, was compiled by examining a museum fish collection, resulting in 72 families and 274 species. Of these species, 127 (46.4%) were marine species and 147 (53.6%) were estuarine-associated species. In terms of their life history and considering the habitat type classification, 188 (almost 70% of the total) were categorized as species inhabiting soft-bottom habitats, reflecting the large estuarine environment and rich fish diversity of the Gulf despite its relatively small area in the tropical Eastern Pacific region. Furthermore, the list contains 13 threatened species of IUCN Red List, which need further research to understand their abundance and their exposure to habitat loss in the Gulf. Further detailed studies on its fish fauna and habitat are needed to better understand and conserve biodiversity within the whole Gulf.
  • Yoshioka, A.; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sekizaki; S. Suda; T. Kadoya; I. Washitani
    Ecological Indicators ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV 36 348 - 355 1470-160X 2014/01 [Refereed]
     
    We proposed a method for evaluating the quantitative contributions of hypothesized focal pressures to biodiversity loss from freshwater ecosystems at regional or local scales. The method, called the "lost biodiversity approach" (abbreviated as "LBA") focuses on local biodiversity losses caused by focal pressures. Lost biodiversity is explicitly estimated by statistically modeling the relationships between factors or focal pressures and "differential biodiversity," defined as the difference between local biodiversity at a sampled site and regional species pool(s). We applied LBA to two cases in Japan: (1) the damselfly fauna of 56 agricultural ponds in a rural region sharing the same regional species pool and (2) freshwater fish fauna in the 13 largest river systems in Hokkaido, which includes multiple species pools. In the former, where nestedness of sampled damselfly assemblages was detected, and thus the difference between local species richness and species pool size was used as a simple indicator of differential biodiversity, biodiversity lost to invasive alien species was successfully quantified. In the latter case, where no nestedness of fish assemblages was detected, and differential biodiversity was analyzed based on an index weighting rare species, biodiversity lost to dams and eutrophication were quantified. The advantages of LBA supported by the case studies were its (1) feasibility, using species snapshot presence-absence data, (2) ability to quantify a baseline for each local community when focal pressures were removed, and (3) ability to evaluate impacts of focal pressures even if each local community belonged to a different species pool. This method will be effective in biodiversity hotspot areas. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Ichthyofaunal assessment of the Gelami and Tinggi Rivers, Pahang River System, eastern Malay Peninsula, following construction of an adjacent building complex
    Miyazaki, Y.; Y. Kano; Y. Tomiyama; C. Mitsuyuki; Z. A. Rashid
    Check List: Journal of Species Lists and Distribution 9 (5) 1035 - 1042 2013/10 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y; A. Terui; K. Kaifu; A. Yoshioka; I. Washitani
    Japanese Journal of Conservation Ecology 18 55 - 68 2013/05 [Refereed]
  • Aquatic marine environmental education utilizing the intertidal rocky shore on the world heritage site, Yaku-shima Island, southern Japan: degree of environmental awareness in local children and benefits for them of the education program
    Murase, A; R. Hayashida; Y. Miyazaki
    Journal of Society of Clinical Education for Individual School Subjects 13 (1) 129 - 141 2013/04 [Refereed]
  • Kano, Y.; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Tomiyama; C. Mitsuyuki; S. Nishida; Z. A. Rashid
    Zoological Science 30 (3) 185 - 191 2013/03 [Refereed]
  • Illustrated checklist of fishes from the Shubuto River System, southwestern Hokkaido, Japan
    Miyazaki, Y.; A. Terui; H. Senou; I. Washitani
    Check List: Journal of Species Lists and Distribution 9 (1) 63 - 72 2013/02 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y; A. Yoshioka; I. Washitani
    Japanese Journal of Conservation Ecology 17 235 - 244 2012/11 [Refereed]
  • Miyazaki, Y; A. Terui; S. Kubo; N. Hatai; K. Takahashi; H. Saitoh; I. Washitani
    Japanese Journal of Conservation Ecology 16 213 - 219 2011/11 [Refereed]
  • Akira Terui; Yusuke Miyazaki; Shin Ichiro S. Matsuzaki; Izumi Washitani
    Japanese Journal of Conservation Ecology 16 (2) 149 - 157 1342-4327 2011/11 [Refereed]
     
    Population status and physicochemical factors affecting local density of endangered freshwater pearl mussels, Margaritifera laevis, in Shubuto river basin were investigated through measurements of local density and individual size of M laevis, and environmental variables at 27 sites (including 324 quadrats: 0.5 × 0.5 m). Proportions of small-sized juveniles were 34 - 100 % depending on the reach, suggesting relatively high recruiting rates. Generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) revealed that the local density is strongly affected positively by dissolved oxygen, %sand, and current velocity. Quadratic terms are also strong for two physical factors, %sand and water depth. The local density tended to be higher at quadrats with 9.30 - 10.2 mg/l dissolved oxygen, 10 - 50 % sand proportion, 0.2 - 0.6 m water depth, and 0.05 - 0.30 m/s current velocity. There were little differences in the factors affecting local density among three size classes (< 20 mm, 20 - 50 mm, > 50 mm). Therefore, the local density was significantly higher at the river fringe with a combination of more suitable physical environment factors than middle of the river. These results suggest that artificial alteration of river fringe could have adverse influences on M. laevis population.
  • Nakae, M.; K. Sasaki; T. Nakajima; Y. Miyazaki; K. Matsuura
    Journal of Morphology WILEY-BLACKWELL 272 (4) 503 - 512 0362-2525 2011/04 [Refereed]
     
    Homologies of the branchial arch muscles in the cyprinid Zacco platypus are assessed based on their innervation. Muscles serving the first gill arch are innervated by branches of the glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve and those serving other arches by the vagal (X) nerve. Absence of the levator posterior is confirmed. Five pairs of muscles originating from the cranium and inserted onto the specialized 5th ceratobranchial, all unique to cyprinids, are innervated by the 4th branchial trunks of X, indicating that all pairs are derivatives of the sphincter oesophagi, involving reorganization from intrinsic to extrinsic elements. Homologies of some ventral branchial muscles are also discussed and the criteria for homology improved by clarifying the innervation pattern. J. Morphol. 272:503-512, 2011. (C) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • A preliminary study of rockpool fish assemblage structure in Tateyama Bay, Boso Peninsula, Chiba, central Japan
    Murase, A; Y. Miyazaki; G. Okuyama; J. Kaiga; Y. Tazaki; T. Sunobe
    Bulletin of the Biogeographical Society of Japan 65 141 - 149 2010/12 [Refereed]
  • Yusuke Miyazaki; Shin Ichiro S. Matsuzaki; Taku Kadoya; Yuichiro Sekizaki; Izumi Washitani
    Japanese Journal of Conservation Ecology 15 (2) 291 - 295 1342-4327 2010/11 [Refereed]
     
    We investigated the presence/absence of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and coverage of aquatic plants including endangered species in 74 small agricultural ponds in hilly regions of Iwate Prefecture, Japan. Our results revealed that the presence of common carp has significant negative effects on the coverage of floating-leaved plants and submerged plants, but not on emergent plants. This indicates that the introduction of common carp to small agricultural ponds can modify habitat conditions for many aquatic organisms by reducing the coverage of aquatic plants.
  • Illegal introduction of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) following enactment of the "Invasive Alien Species Act"
    Miyazaki, Y
    Japanese Journal of Ichthyology 57 86 - 87 2010/04 [Refereed]
  • 魚類図鑑製作過程における道徳・自然教育効果の検証
    宮崎 佑介; 佐々木 剛
    臨床教科教育学会誌 9 (1) 75 - 84 2009/04 [Refereed]
  • Fish fauna of Tokashiku Bay, Tokashiki Island, the Kerama Islands, Okinawa Prefecture
    Watai, M; Y. Miyazaki; A. Murase; H. Senou
    Bulletin of the Kanagawa Prefectural Museum Natural Science (38) 119 - 132 2009/03
  • 魚類図鑑の制作は環境教育に有効か?―東京都港区港南における case study―
    宮崎 佑介; 佐々木 剛
    水圏環境教育研究誌 1 53 - 86 2008/03

MISC

  • 2021年度日本魚類学会年会(ウェブ大会)の開催報告
    2021年度日本魚類学会年会(ウェブ大会)実行委員会  魚類学雑誌  69-  (2)  251  -252  2022/10
  • 丸山 隆; 山崎 充哲; 宮崎 佑介  東京都の保護上重要な野生生物種(本土部)―東京都レッドリスト(本土部)2020年版―  97  -103  2021/03
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055851A122055879  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Hasegawa, K; S. Kanao; Y. Miyazaki; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T21383A110464790  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T116034997A116035023  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055686A122055694  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T62203A114898978  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Hasegawa, K; S. Kanao; Y. Miyazaki; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055564A122055572  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T110463465A110463483  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T14562A110462698  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T110462374A110462410  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Hasegawa, K; S. Kanao; Y. Miyazaki; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T213A116034178  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055219A122055238  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T133502056A110460101  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T114826113A114826126  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055172A122055186  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055162A122500585  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T114827545A114827638  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055117A122055137  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; T. Mukai; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T114639882A114639912  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T122055065A122055069  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T169610A114824825  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Miyazaki, Y; J. Nakajima; K. Takaku; Y. Taniguchi  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T114639398A114639410  2019  [Refereed][Invited]
  • Watanabe, K; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Taniguchi; T. Mukai; R. Inui  The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019  e.T114828525A114828583  [Refereed][Invited]

Books and other publications

Lectures, oral presentations, etc.

  • 宮古島の魚類相の特徴とその面白さ  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    好きを学びに!第1回 宮古島のお魚を語る会:研究・学習対象としての魚類  2024/03
  • ハナダイ科スミツキハナダイ属魚類の分類学的再検討および尖閣諸島から得られた1未記載種  [Not invited]
    野村玲偉; 上地健琉; 和田英敏; 宮崎佑介
    第57回日本魚類学会年会  2023/09
  • カエルウオとニセカエルウオの識別点に関する再検討  [Not invited]
    畠中智康; 緒方悠輝也; 村瀬敦宣; 宮崎佑介
    第57回日本魚類学会年会  2023/09
  • 東京都本土部における魚類相とその保全上の課題  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    令和4年度 東京都 水生生物講演会  2023/01
  • 「お魚市場体験」による普及教育効果の検討  [Not invited]
    青木宏樹; 宮崎佑介
    第56回日本魚類学会年会  2022/09
  • 沖縄県近海産スミツキハナダイ属魚類の形態的特徴と分類学的検討  [Not invited]
    野村玲偉; 宮崎佑介
    第56回日本魚類学会年会  2022/09
  • Ecosystem size and complexity dictate riverine biodiversity  [Not invited]
    Terui, A., S. Kim, C. L. Dolph, T. Kadoya, Y. Miyazaki
    Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting 2021  2021/05
  • 幼児向けの魚介類を用いた体験型学習会による普及効果の分析  [Not invited]
    青木 宏樹; 宮崎 佑介
    日本生態学会第68回全国大会  2021/03
  • 山形県の博物館 4 施設における魚拓資料の調査  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第54回日本魚類学会年会  2020/11
  • WEB上に散在する 潜在的な自然史資料の収集  [Invited]
    宮崎佑介
    日本生態学会関東地区公開オンラインシンポジウム 「生物多様性情報を使い倒す~GBIF入門~」  2020/10
  • 生物多様性情報としての魚拓:活用手法の開発と課題  [Not invited]
    宮崎佑介; 村瀬敦宣
    日本生態学会第67回全国大会  2020/03
  • 北海道の魚拓文化:釣具・釣餌店の調査を通して  [Not invited]
    宮崎佑介
    第41回魚類系統研究会  2019/12
  • 釣具・釣船店における魚拓の調査:過去の分布情報としての検討  [Not invited]
    宮崎佑介; 村瀬敦宣
    第52回日本魚類学会年会  2019/09
  • 日本魚類学会若手の会キックオフシンポジウム〜学会の持続的な発展を目指して〜  [Not invited]
    川西亮太; 木村祐貴; 邉見由美; 日比野友亮; 宮崎佑介
    2019年度日本魚類学会サテライトシンポジウム  2019/09
  • もっと魚を詳しく知ろう!  [Invited]
    宮崎佑介
    白梅まなびの教室 2019 第2回  2019/08
  • 市民が取得した魚類の情報を科学的に活用する試み  [Invited]
    宮崎佑介
    第27回KYOTOオープンサイエンス勉強会  2019/01
  • 日本最北端・最南端地域における“魚拓相”の調査  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第51回日本魚類学会年会(50周年記念大会)  2018/10
  • 未知ギョとの遭遇[横浜港編]〜東京湾“初”記録とは?〜  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    ヨコハマ海洋市民大学 2018年度第6回講座  2018/08
  • 魚介類と幼児教育・保育  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    水圏環境教育研究会第7回定期大会  2018/03
  • シロギスとアオギスの比較:魚拓に表れる実物との形態学的誤差  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 村瀬 敦宣
    第50回日本魚類学会年会  2017/09
  • “かいぼり”の意義とその応用可能性について  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    多摩川中流域に残存する谷戸地形(都立農業高等学校附属神代農場)の生物多様性に関する研究と谷戸地を利用した環境教育〔公益財団法人とうきゅう環境財団,平成28年度研究助成事業採択課題:小作明則(進化生物学研究所)〕  2017/07
  • 幼少期における自然体験の意義:自然科学との接点  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    水圏環境教育研究会第6回定期大会  2017/03
  • 潮間帯性動物群集の地理的変化:緯度を反映するのは岩礁か河口干潟か?  [Not invited]
    村瀬 敦宣; 三木 涼平; 宮崎 佑介
    日本生態学会第64回全国大会  2017/03
  • 魚拓の可能性:生物多様性情報としての活用方法の検討  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    日本生態学会第64回全国大会  2017/03
  • 朱太川水系におけるシラウオとジュズカケハゼの記録およびレッドリスト作成の検討  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第49回日本魚類学会年会  2016/09
  • 幼児から中学生までを対象とした朱太川水系における実践的自然教育  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    東京大学大気海洋研究所共同利用研究集会「次世代、次々世代の魚類学者、海洋生物学者を育てるために、ボトムアップで今何をなすべきか。アウトリーチと学校教育の融合を目指して。」  2016/08
  • もっと魚を楽しむ  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    Cafe 自愉時間 vo. 10  2016/03
  • 宮崎県における河口域魚類相の網羅的解明に向けた基盤整備  [Not invited]
    村瀬 敦宣; 乾 隆帝; 三木 涼平; 宮崎 佑介; 小山 彰彦; 江口 勝久; 瀬能 宏; 岩槻 幸雄; 神田 猛
    第27回魚類生態研究会  2016/02
  • 勇払原野から記録された特異な形態のフナ属魚類個体群の現況  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第37回魚類系統研究会  2015/11
  • Coastal fish fauna of Manuel Antonio National Park, Costa Rica  [Not invited]
    Sahara, R; A. Murase; Y. Miyazaki; O. N. Jiménez
    I Congreso Costarricense y IV Simposio Latinoamericano de Ictiología  2015/11
  • Registering photographic records of Labrisomus jenkinsi (Heller and Snodgrass 1903) (Perciformes, Labrisomidae) from Pacific coast of Costa Rica as a museum collection: Implications for significance of fish image database  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; A. Angulo; H. Senou
    I Congreso Costarricense y IV Simposio Latinoamericano de Ictiología  2015/11
  • Integration and application of potential museum collections of natural history disseminated on the Web for biodiversity data accumulation and public conservation awareness  [Invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; H. Senou
    CS-DC’15 World e-Conference (Complex Systems Digital Campus 2015 World e-Conference) in CCS’15 (Conference on Complex Systems 2015)  2015/10
  • 朱太川水系の魚類の流程分布を活用した教材開発の試み  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第48回日本魚類学会年会  2015/09
  • 朱太川の魚~自然環境教育への応用~  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第5回 黒松内町 生物多様性まつり 調査結果報告会  2015/07
  • 魚類写真資料の自然史研究への応用法  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    西日本自然史系博物館ネットワーク「自然史博物館は『オープン化』にどうむきあうか?」  2015/07
  • Immigration potential explains variable species’ response to physical habitat conditions  [Not invited]
    Terui, A; Y. Miyazaki
    Vth International Wildlife Management Congress  2015/07
  • A cryptic Allee effect: spatial contexts mask an existing fitness-density relationship  [Not invited]
    Terui, A; Y. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka; S. S. Matsuzaki
    Ecological Society of Japan, 62nd Annual Meeting  2015/03
  • 移入ポテンシャルが局所環境―魚類個体数の関係におよぼす波及効果:小規模自然再生への示唆  [Not invited]
    照井 慧; 宮崎 佑介
    2014年度日本生態学会北海道地区会  2015/02
  • Integrating and utilizing citizen biodiversity data on the web for science: An example  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; M. Shiina; R. Masui; H. Senou
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2015 Annual Meeting: Innovations, Information, and Imaging  2015/02
  • A natural history museum as a platform for accumulating verifiable information on non-native fishes: A Japanese example  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; H. Senou
    Citizen Science 2015 Conference  2015/02
  • 久保川イーハトーブ世界の魚たち  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    久保川自然再生協議会主催フォーラム「『地域おこしと自然再生』見つめよう!地域の自然遺産と文化遺産」  2014/12
  • 止まらないブラックバスの違法放流  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 瀬能 宏
    2014年度日本魚類学会年会公開シンポジウム「日本の外来魚問題の現状を考える:外来生物法制定から10年で何が変わったのか?」  2014/11
  • 外来魚類の再検証可能な情報集積場としての自然史博物館の役割  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 村瀬 敦宣; 瀬能 宏
    第47回日本魚類学会年会  2014/11
  • FishPix: Image database of fishes developed by the Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History and the National Museum of Nature and Science in Japan  [Invited]
    Nakae, M; Y. Miyazaki; H. Senou; K. Matsuura
    Pacific Neighborhood Consortium 2014 Annual Meeting and Joint Meeting  2014/10
  • The monitoring functions of an Internet community for non-native fish invasions and introductions  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; M. Shiina; K. Naoe; R. Nakashiro; J. Honda; J. Yamaide; H. Senou
    3rd International Marine Conservation Congress  2014/08
  • 身近な水辺に棲む魚たちの保全  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第111回サロン・ド・小田原  2014/07
  • Citizen participation in augmenting a museum’s database enhances fish monitoring and public awareness  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; H. Senou
    5th International Pacific Marine Educators Network Conference  2014/07
  • Asymmetric dispersal structures a metapopulation of the freshwater pearl mussel  [Not invited]
    Terui, A; Y. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka; K. Kaifu; S. S. Matsuzaki; I. Washitani
    2014 Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting  2014/05
  • インターネットコミュニティーの外来魚類モニタリング機能  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 村瀬 敦宣; 椎名 雅人; 直江 憲一; 中城 亮祐; 本多 順一; 山出 潤一郎; 瀬能 宏
    日本生態学会第61回全国大会  2014/03
  • Riverine metapopulation dynamics of freshwater pearl mussel mediated by biotic and abiotic vectors  [Not invited]
    Yusuke Miyazaki
    Ecological Society of Japan, 61st Annual Meeting  2014/03
  • Biological monitoring by general citizens via the Internet atlas of fishes and its bulletin board system  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; M. Shiina; K. Naoe; R. Nakashiro; J. Honda; J. Yamaide; H. Senou
    Asian Fish Biodiversity Conference 2014  2014/02
  • 北上川水系磐井川の3支流域における潜在的な魚類の種プールと魚類相  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 中江 雅典; 瀬能 宏
    第46回日本魚類学会年会  2013/10
  • Biased dispersal of larvae of Margaritifera laevis by its host fish  [Not invited]
    Terui, A; Y. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka; T. Kadoya; F. Jop; I. Washitani
    43rd Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of Germany, Austria and Switzerland (GfOe)  2013/09
  • A “lost biodiversity” approach to revealing major anthropogenic threats to regional freshwater ecosystems  [Not invited]
    Yoshioka, A; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sekizaki; S. Suda; T. Kadoya; I. Washitani
    11th International Association for Ecology (INTECOL) Congress  2013/08
  • A restoration and conservation agenda for the fishes of the Shubuto River System  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Terui; A. Yoshioka; I. Washitani
    26th International Congress for Conservation Biology  2013/07
  • Attempt to reconstruct the past fish fauna of the Shubuto River System, SW Hokkaido, Japan using museum specimens and interviews  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Yoshioka; I. Washitani
    9th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference  2013/06
  • Attempts to improve the Internet atlas of Japanese fishes from web 1.0 to web 2.0  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Murase; M. Shiina; K. Naoe; R. Nakashiro; N. Miwa; J. Honda; J. Yamaide
    9th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference  2013/06
  • Asymmetric dispersal of larvae of Margaritifera laevis by its host fish  [Not invited]
    Terui, A; A. Yoshioka; Y. Miyazaki; T. Kadoya; F. Jop; I. Washitani
    Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting 2013  2013/05
  • ヤマメによるカワシンジュガイ幼生の分散:上流側への偏りと支流への移動  [Not invited]
    照井 慧; 吉岡 明良; 宮崎 佑介; 角谷 拓; 鷲谷 いづみ
    日本生態学会第60回全国大会  2013/03
  • 博物館標本と聞き取り調査によって朱太川水系の過去の魚類相を再構築する試み  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 吉岡 明良; 鷲谷 いづみ
    日本生態学会第60回全国大会  2013/03
  • 朱太川水系における魚類の保全と再生に向けた基礎的知見  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第62回Toho Rendezvous with Ecology and Evolution seminar  2012/12
  • 聞き取り・博物館標本・文献調査によって過去の朱太川水系の魚類相を再構築する試み  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 吉岡 明良; 鷲谷 いづみ
    第34回魚類系統研究会  2012/12
  • 博物館標本と聞き取り調査によって朱太川水系における過去の魚類相を再構築する試み  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 吉岡 明良; 鷲谷 いづみ
    第45回日本魚類学会年会  2012/09
  • 朱太川の魚類  [Invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    第2回 黒松内町 生物多様性まつり 調査結果報告会  2012/07
  • Spatial evaluation of a life-stage structured metapopulation of endangered freshwater pearl mussels in dendritic network  [Not invited]
    Terui, A; Y. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka; K. Kaifu; S. S. Matsuzaki; I. Washitani
    5th East Asian Federation of Ecological Societies  2012/03
  • Evaluation of temporal lentic fish habitats in Shubuto River floodplains, Hokkaido, northern Japan  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; A. Terui; A. Yoshioka; I. Washitani
    5th East Asian Federation of Ecological Societies  2012/03
  • 朱太川の河川敷における一時的止水域を利用する魚類の分布と保全生態学的評価  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 照井 慧; 吉岡 明良; 鷲谷 いづみ
    第33回魚類系統研究会  2011/12
  • 朱太川氾濫原(北海道南西部)の一時的止水域における淡水魚類の空間分布  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 照井 慧; 吉岡 明良; 鷲谷 いづみ
    第44回日本魚類学会年会  2011/10
  • 健全なカワシンジュガイ個体群と生息適地の解明  [Not invited]
    照井 慧; 宮崎 佑介; 松崎 慎一郎; 鷲谷 いづみ
    日本生態学会第58回全国大会  2011/03
  • 河川横断構造物のない朱太川水系における魚類群集と空間分布  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 照井 慧; 鷲谷 いづみ
    河川横断構造物のない朱太川水系における魚類群集と空間分布  2011/03
  • 渡島半島北部におけるエゾホトケドジョウとフクドジョウの自然分布の可能性  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 照井 慧; 久保 優; 畑井 信男; 齋藤 均; 高橋 興世; 鷲谷 いづみ
    第32回魚類系統研究会  2010/12
  • 黒松内低地帯の魚類の分散障壁としての可能性  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 照井 慧; 畑井 信男; 齋藤 均; 高橋 興世; 鷲谷 いづみ
    第43回日本魚類学会年会  2010/09
  • 農業用ため池における在来淡水魚類の空間分布  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 角谷 拓; 鷲谷 いづみ
    日本生態学会第57回全国大会  2010/03
  • 屋久島の潮間帯を利用した環境教育の試み◆生態学的知見を環境学習に役立てる◆  [Not invited]
    村瀬 敦宣; 林田 留美子; 宮崎 佑介
    第21回西日本魚類生態研究会  2010/02
  • Spatial distribution of freshwater fishes in rice paddy ecosystem  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; T. Kadoya; I. Washitani
    8th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference  2009/06
  • Rocky intertidal fish communities along the Kuroshio Current, western Pacific. What knowledge they inform us?  [Not invited]
    Murase, A; Y. Miyazaki; T. Sunobe
    8th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference  2009/06
  • 久保川流域の水田水域における生物群集  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介
    樹木葬 春の研修 植生調査報告会  2009/05
  • 水田水域ネットワークにおける淡水魚類の空間分布  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 角谷 拓; 鷲谷 いづみ
    日本生態学会第56回全国大会  2009/03
  • 房総半島沿岸における潮間帯岩礁域の魚類相~黒潮流域における群集生態学への展望~  [Not invited]
    村瀬 敦宣; 宮崎 佑介; 奥山 玄; 海賀 純吉; 田崎 陽平
    第9回東日本魚類生態研究会  2009/03
  • 東京湾湾奥部の運河における魚類相の変遷とその要因  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 角谷 拓; 茂木 正人; 鷲谷 いづみ
    個体群生態学会第24回大会  2008/10
  • オイカワの筋肉系とその神経支配  [Not invited]
    中江 雅典; 佐々木 邦夫; 中島 経夫; 宮崎 佑介; 松浦 啓一
    第41回日本魚類学会年会  2008/09
  • The process of a pictorial book of fishes as an educational tool in the Keihin Canal Watershed, inner part of Tokyo Bay  [Not invited]
    Miyazaki, Y; T. Sasaki
    International Symposium on Systematics and Diversity of Fishes  2008/03
  • 東京湾湾奥部の運河における魚類の出現様式と生息環境  [Not invited]
    宮崎 佑介; 茂木 正人
    第40回日本魚類学会年会  2007/10

Research Themes

  • 遊漁者によって記録された過去の生物多様性情報を科学的に評価する手法確立
    日本学術振興会科学研究費補助金 若手研究
    Date (from‐to) : 2020/04 -2024/03 
    Author : 宮崎 佑介
  • 地域の自然史情報の価値づけと集約の場としての博物館の機能
    琵琶湖博物館共同研究
    Date (from‐to) : 2020/04 -2022/03 
    Author : 金尾 滋史; 中尾 博行; 中村 久美子; 宮崎 佑介; 石田 惣; 白川 勝信
  • 短期大学における保育者養成の在り方に関する研究―短期大学2年間で専門職を育てるための養成教育改革を提言する―
    白梅学園大学・白梅学園短期大学子ども学研究所研究助成金
    Date (from‐to) : 2019/04 -2022/03 
    Author : 中山 正雄; 小松 歩; 安形 元伸; 佐藤 文; 瀧口 優; 長井 覚子; 花原 幹夫; 源 証香; 宮崎 佑介
  • 生物多様性保全のための自然教育
    水産庁:水産物販売促進緊急対策事業(販売促進会・PR活動の実施事業)
    Date (from‐to) : 2020/09 -2021/03 
    Author : 宮崎 佑介
  • 市民が保有する生物多様性情報「魚拓」の科学的活用法の検討
    日本学術振興会科学研究費補助金 若手研究(B)
    Date (from‐to) : 2016/04 -2020/03 
    Author : 宮崎 佑介
  • 里地・里山の生物多様性・生態系サービス指標および評価手法の開発
    日本学術振興会科学研究費補助金 基盤研究(B)
    Date (from‐to) : 2014/04 -2019/03 
    Author : 鷲谷 いづみ, 境 優, 宮崎 佑介, 大谷 雅人, 吉岡 明良
  • WEB上に散在する潜在的自然史資料の発掘とその活用
    日本学術振興会科学研究費補助金 特別研究員奨励費
    Date (from‐to) : 2013/04 -2016/03 
    Author : 宮崎 佑介
  • 溜池システムの魚類メタ群集構造の解析
    東京大学学術研究活動等奨励事業(国外)
    Date (from‐to) : 2009 
    Author : 宮崎 佑介